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Unstuffed Stuff Cabbage Recipe

Unstuffed Stuffed Cabbage Casserole
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Have you ever heard of an unstuffed cabbage casserole? What about a stuffed cabbage casserole? Well, we decided to get a little creative and combine the two making a recipe for “Unstuffed” Stuffed Cabbage Casserole. It’s packed with those cabbage flavors you love, but it’s also made with a fuss-free weeknight dinner in mind. We know things can get hectic, but you shouldn’t have to sacrifice your favorite flavors because of time constraints. Now, with our “Unstuffed” Stuffed Cabbage Casserole, you don’t have to.

What You’ll Need

  • 1 small cabbage, cored
  • 1 pound lean ground beef
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 1 (15-ounce) can plus 1 (8-ounce) can no-salt-added tomato sauce, divided
  • 1 teaspoon tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons light brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 1/2 cup cooked rice

What to Do

  1. In a soup pot over high heat, bring 1 inch of water to a boil. Place cabbage in water, cored-side down. Cover pot, reduce heat to low, and steam 20 minutes or until cabbage leaves pull apart easily. Drain, then chop roughly; set aside.
  2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, cook ground beef and onion 5 to 7 minutes or until browned. Add the 15-ounce can tomato sauce, the tomato paste, lemon juice, brown sugar, garlic powder, salt, pepper, and rice; mix well. Stir in cabbage, then place in a 9- x 13-inch baking dish. Place remaining tomato sauce over top, then cover with aluminum foil.
  3. Bake 30 minutes, uncover, and continue baking 10 to 15 minutes or until heated through.

Cabbage and it’s Colorful History

Cabbage is a versatile veggie that we can do so much with. Not only is it a colorful food, coming in greens, reds, and whites, but it also has a colorful history. In fact, it can be traced as far back as the ancient Greeks, and then to 14th-century England, when the first round-headed version of cabbage appeared. Curious about when it came to America? Well, that’s rumored to have happened between 1541-1542 when the French explorer Jacques Cartier brought them over on his third voyage. 

Thank you for reading 🙂

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