Bob Marley – redemption song acustic/ Song Share

Lyrics

(No Kwazulu, No Kwazulu)
(No Boputatswana)
(No Lebowa). Repeat
Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery
None but ourselves can free our minds
Have no fear for atomic energy
For none of them can stop the time
How long shell they kill our prophets
While we stand aside and look
Some say it’s just a part of it
We’ve got to fulfill the book

[Chorus]
So won’t you help to sing (No Kwazulu)
These songs of freedom (No boputatswana)
‘Cause all I ever hear (No Transkei)
Is Redemption Song

Soldiers march their freedom
Out into the city streats
And though it seems like a loosing battle
These can be no retreat

[Chorus]

Songwriters: BOB MARLEY
© Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd.
For non-commercial use only.


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Redemption Song”
Bob Marley and the Wailers - Redemption Song.jpg
Single by Bob Marley and the Wailers
from the album Uprising
B-side
Released October 1980[1]
Genre Folk
Length 3:49
Label Island/Tuff Gong
Songwriter(s) Bob Marley
Producer(s) Bob Marley, Chris Blackwell

Redemption Song” is a song by Bob Marley. It is the final track on Bob Marley & the Wailers‘ ninth album, Uprising, produced by Chris Blackwell and released by Island Records.[2] The song is considered one of Marley’s greatest works. Some key lyrics derived from a speech given by the Pan-Africanist orator Marcus Garvey entitled “The Work That Has Been Done”.[3]

At the time he wrote the song, circa 1979, Bob Marley had been diagnosed with the cancer in his toe that later took his life. According to Rita Marley, “he was already secretly in a lot of pain and dealt with his own mortality, a feature that is clearly apparent in the album, particularly in this song”.

Unlike most of Bob Marley’s tracks, it is strictly a solo acoustic recording, consisting of his singing and playing an acoustic guitar, without accompaniment. The song is in the key of G major.

“Redemption Song” was released as a single in the UK and France in October 1980, and included a full band rendering of the song. This version has since been included as a bonus track on the 2001 reissue of Uprising, as well as on the 2001 compilation One Love: The Very Best of Bob Marley & The Wailers. Although in live performances the full band was used for the song the solo recorded performance remains the take most familiar to listeners.[citation needed]

In 2004, Rolling Stone placed the song at #66 among “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time“. In 2010, the New Statesman listed it as one of the Top 20 Political Songs.[4]

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