Category Archives: Health Information

Things That Happen When Your Diabetes Goes Untreated

When you hear “diabetes,” your mind likely jumps to problems with producing insulin and regulating blood sugar. And that’s definitely a key part of this chronic disease, which affects nearly 1 in 10 Americans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But that’s also just the tip of the iceberg.

“Diabetes is like termites, in that it causes slow, hidden, but significant damage in the body,” says Osama Hamdy, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Inpatient Diabetes Program at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. “Most patients with type 2 diabetes die from a heart attack,” Dr. Hamdy says, “but because the disease doesn’t have many symptoms, people tend to take it lightly.”

And evidence continues to mount that diabetes affects every system in the body, wreaking havoc if it’s not well managed. Learn more below about the side effects of diabetes and how you can protect yourself from complications. (The good news: Most can be avoided by following the treatment plan set out by your doctor.)

1) High blood pressure and cholesterol

When you have type 2 diabetes, your body can’t properly use insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar. In turn, your HDL (or “good”) cholesterol lowers, and your levels of harmful blood fats called triglycerides rise. Insulin resistance also contributes to hardened, narrow arteries, which in turn increases your blood pressure.

As a result, about 2 of 3 people with diabetes also have hypertension—a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and trouble with thinking and memory. Failing to control high blood pressure and high cholesterol, either with diet and exercise alone or by adding medications, accelerates the rate at which all your other complications progress, says Robert Gabbay, M.D., Ph.D., chief medical officer at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston.

2) Brain health issues

“It appears that people with diabetes have some abnormalities of blood flow control to the brain,” explains Helena Rodbard, M.D., an endocrinologist based in Maryland. “And this appears to be correlated with a more rapid loss of mental function with age,” she says, including the ability to plan, organize, remember things, prioritizes, pay attention, and get started on tasks.

To protect your brain health, you’ll want to stay active physically and mentally, logging at least 30 minutes of exercise a day and keeping your mind stimulated. “Read, socialize, work, and play games that challenge your intellect,” Dr. Rodbard says. “Keep a positive, optimistic attitude—don’t permit yourself to become depressed.”

3) Gum disease

People with diabetes are more likely to develop periodontal disease, an infection of the gum and bone that can lead to painful chewing problems and tooth loss. “This is due in part to elevated blood sugar that modifies the collagen in all of our tissues,” Dr. Rodbard says. “It’s also due to a slight increase in susceptibility to infections of all kinds.”

On the other hand, gum disease—specifically inflammation of the gums or development of deep abscesses—can raise blood sugar and make diabetes harder to control, according to Dr. Hamdy. To prevent periodontitis, brush and floss daily and consider using a mild antiseptic mouthwash to knock out any lingering plaque.

4) Sex difficulties

Many men with diabetes will experience some level of erectile dysfunction (ED) in their lifetime. “ED can be psychological or due to reduced testosterone,” Dr. Hamdy says, noting that low testosterone is common among people with diabetes, especially if they’re obese. “However, in patients with a long duration of diabetes, changes in blood vessels and nerve supply to the penis could be the cause.” If you have diabetes, are over age 40, and have been having trouble with your male equipment, see your doctor.

Middle-aged and older women with diabetes also tend to have sexual issues, according to a study of nearly 2,300 women published in Obstetrics & Gynecology, likely because nerve damage can impair lubrication and the ability to achieve orgasm.

5) Hearing loss

While we all lose some hearing as we age, hearing loss is twice as common in people with diabetes compared to those without the condition, according to the CDC. Diabetes may lead to hearing loss by damaging the small blood vessels and nerves in the inner ear, the CDC says.

The best way to protect your hearing is to keep your blood sugar levels in check, Dr. Rodbard says. In fact, in a study from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, older women with uncontrolled diabetes had more hearing loss than women the same age who had well-controlled diabetes. The CDC also suggests getting your hearing checked every year and avoiding other causes of hearing loss, like exposure to loud noises, when possible.

6) Skin infections

Having diabetes spikes your risk for all kinds of skin issues, including bacterial infections such as boils and urinary tract infections, fungal infections, and itching. “Fungal infections, especially yeast infections, are so common that they may even be the first sign of diabetes in someone who hasn’t yet been diagnosed,” Dr. Hamdy says.

In some cases, skin infections can be tied to obesity, because there are “moist places between skin folds that may breed bacteria and fungi, including candida,” Dr. Rodbard says.

Unfortunately, several diabetes medications increase the risk of fungal infections of the genitalia, Dr. Hamdy says, because they enhance glucose excretion in urine, fueling the growth of bacteria and fungus. Controlling blood sugar levels helps with prevention, but once you have an infection, seek out the usual treatments: over-the-counter antifungal vaginal creams and suppositories, to be used as directed.

7) Obstructive sleep apnea

This potentially serious sleep disorder, in which the throat muscles intermittently relax and block the airway during sleep, affects around 50% of people with diabetes, Dr. Hamdy says, especially those who are obese and have a collar size of more than 17 for men and 16 for women.

The most obvious sign of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is audible snoring. Unfortunately, like gum disease, “sleep apnea may worsen diabetes control,” Dr. Hamdy says, possibly because the two conditions share risk factors. Treatment for OSA may involve using a device to keep your airway open at night or wearing a mouthpiece that thrusts your jaw forward. In severe cases, surgery can help by altering the structure of the nose, mouth, or throat.

8) Vision problems

Roughly 1 in 3 people with diabetes older than age 40 have diabetic retinopathy or damage to the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. This happens because elevated blood glucose levels over time harm the eye’s delicate blood vessels, a process that can begin as early as 7 years before diagnosis.

The good news is, treating these problems early can reduce the risk of blindness by 95%, per the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).

9) Kidney failure

Over time, high blood glucose thickens and scars the nephrons, tiny structures within the kidneys that filter your blood. About 7% of the time, you’ll already have protein leaking into your urine—an early sign of kidney problems—by the time you receive a type 2 diabetes diagnosis.

About half of those who don’t take steps to control their diabetes will sustain kidney damage within 10 years, and 40% of those will progress to kidney failure, a condition requiring either dialysis or a kidney transplant, says Betul Hatipoglu, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic.

10) Neuropathy

About half of people with type 2 diabetes will develop neuropathy, the most common diabetes complication. At first, you might have no symptoms or feel a mild tingling or numbness in your hands or feet, says Dr. Gabbay. But eventually, this form of nerve damage can cause pain, weakness, and digestive troubles as it strikes the nerves that control your gastrointestinal tract.

In addition to managing your blood sugar, being physically active, eating a healthy diet, and keeping up with recommended medications can help prevent diabetes-related nerve damage, the NIDDK says.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/10-unexpected-things-that-happen-to-your-body-if-diabetes-goes-untreated/ss-BBMFPNi?ocid=msedgntp#image=11

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What To Do When Someone, Achoos

Science Says Do This First and Fast When Someone Near You Sneezes or Coughs

While we are programmed to say “Bless You” to people around us who sneeze, we may not be programmed to do what we actually need to do. That is, back up…way up and fast! Researchers have uncovered some staggering statistics about the common sneeze and cough that warn us all to take action!

It is pretty common knowledge that coughing and sneezing spread germs, but you will be amazed at just how far contagious germs can travel. Researchers from the University of Bristol assessed the survival of airborne bacteria contained in aerosol droplets from coughs and sneezes.

How far do contagious germs in a sneeze really travel?

Amazingly contagious germs are able to fly through the air at an alarmingly high rate of speed. Researchers found that the average sneeze or cough can transport 100,000 infectious germs through the air at a speed of up to 100 miles per hour.

These germs contain viruses including influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenoviruses, which cause the common cold. Not only that, but they also carry bacteria, such as Streptococcus pneumonia or Haemophilus influenza. According to researchers, the first few minutes after a sneeze or a cough is when the germs are most likely to spread, and spread fast.

Study author, Allen Haddrell, Ph.D. expresses that the droplets are so small that they can penetrate deep in the lung. Although aerosols that carry germs will eventually make their way to the ground, it can take some time.

“Given the small size of bioaerosol droplets (diameter less than the width of a human hair), they can remain suspended in the air for prolonged periods of time, from seconds to weeks.”

Bacteria needed to be at risk

This recent research revealed that each droplet has about 20 bacteria in it. When it comes to viruses including colds and the flu, it takes about 1,000 to cause an infection. What this means is that 50 droplets would need to be inhaled for you to be at risk. This is not difficult to do if you are standing in the line of fire of sneezer or cougher.

How to stay safe from germs

Microbiologist Jason Tetro warns that standing closer than six feet to a sneezer or cougher puts you in the “at-risk” zone. In addition to backing away, here are some other ways to ward off germs:

  • Keep a scarf handy – A scarf can work two ways. If you have a cold, keep a scarf handy to sneeze or cough into. This protects those in your presence from being contaminated. If you are not sick, keep a scarf handy to protect yourself from those that are.
  • Wash your hands – Keep your hands washed, especially during cold and flu season. Make sure that you scrub your hands for 30 seconds and be sure to wash thoroughly between your fingers and under your nails.
  • Wear a mask – If you have a weakened immune system or are a little sick yourself, you may wish to wear a mask when in public. A face mask will protect others as well as yourself from fast-flying bacteria-laden sneezes and coughs.
  • Keep the lid closed at home – When at home, always close the lid to your toilet before flushing.  According to Haddrell.

“The act of flushing a toilet has been found to produce droplets containing microorganisms, where the spray can reach as far as 6 feet and as high as 2.7 feet and can contaminate surfaces like the door handle and toilet flusher.”

Keep your hands out of your mouth, nose, and eyes

It is easy for bacteria to enter the body via your nose, eyes, and mouth. When you are out in public or have been around someone who is sick, be sure to avoid putting your hands near your face, which encourages the spread of possibly dangerous bacteria.

-The Alternative Daily

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Pre-existing Conditions Will…

MAKE IT HARDER TO FIGHT CORONAVIRUS

Early data from China, where the new coronavirus COVID-19 first started, shows that some people are at higher risk of serious health complications from the new coronavirus. Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this includes people who have serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes, lung disease, and mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety. 

Here’s why these conditions increase the risk for COVID-19 complications—and what you should do if you’re affected. 

Heart disease

People with heart disease tend to have other underlying conditions like high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, diabetes, and lung disease, which weaken the body’s health defense systems (including the immune system) against viral infection, William Li, MD, physician-scientist, and author of Eat To Beat Disease: The New Science of How Your Body Can Heal Itself, tells Health.

“The fever associated with COVID-19 puts additional strain on the body’s metabolic demands, stressing out the already weakened heart,” explains Dr. Li. “Pneumonia, which is commonly seen with COVID-19, makes it harder for the lungs to oxygenate the blood. This puts further stress on the heart.” Plus, inflammation caused by the infection can damage the lining of blood vessels through which the heart pumps blood. 

In February, the American College of Cardiology issued a bulletin to warn patients about the potential increased risk of COVID-19 that included additional precautions to take. The bulletin recommends that people with cardiovascular disease stay up to date with vaccinations, including for pneumonia, and get a flu shot to prevent another source of fever. 

Dr. Li advises regular exercise (while social distancing, of course) and a healthy diet to help strengthen the heart during the COVID-19 era. 

Chronic respiratory disease

Chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs), which include asthma and pulmonary hypertension, are diseases of the airways and other parts of the lung. People with CRDs need to be especially vigilant about the coronavirus because one of the possible complications is pneumonia. “Pneumonia compromises the lung, which brings oxygen to the body,” explains Dr. Li. “In patients who already have a chronic respiratory disease, it can be lethal.” 

Besides following the CDC guidelines for handwashing, social distancing, and other coronavirus preventive steps, The COPD Foundation has issued further advice for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (such as chronic bronchitis or emphysema). As reported in Pulmonary Advisor, this includes having at least a 30-day supply of all required medications on hand. If a patient requires an oxygen supply, they should contact their supplier to find out how to prepare for a COVID-19 outbreak in their area. 

Diabetes

Last week, actor Tom Hanks revealed on Instagram that he and his wife, Rita Wilson, tested positive for COVID-19. Hanks previously shared that he has type 2 diabetes, which means he’s at an increased risk of serious illness from the new coronavirus. 

What makes the coronavirus so dangerous for people with diabetes? First, because the immune system is compromised, it’s harder for the body to fight off the coronavirus, states the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF). Viruses also may thrive when blood glucose levels are high. 

People with diabetes have heightened levels of inflammation throughout their bodies, which is another risk factor. “If you have a viral infection, that can turn into pneumonia easier, because diabetes itself is an inflammatory disease,” Maria Pena, MD, director of endocrine services at Mount Sinai Doctors Forest Hills, previously told Health. “It’s also important to note that when a person has diabetes, episodes of stress, like a viral infection, can increase blood sugar levels, which can also lead to complications.”

Everyone should be taking precautionary measures during the COVID-19 outbreak (whether they have preexisting health conditions or not), and the IDF says it’s even more crucial for those living with diabetes. That means washing your hands thoroughly and frequently, avoiding touching your face as much as possible, cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces, and avoiding close contact with those showing symptoms of a respiratory illness.

The IDF also recommends additional precautionary steps for those with diabetes. Monitoring blood glucose levels should be a priority, because any kind of infection can raise blood sugar levels. This increases the need for water, so it’s important to have an adequate supply. To prepare for a quarantine, make sure you have enough medication, testing supplies, and food to last for at least a month. 

People with diabetes should be particularly careful about social contact. “As a diabetic, I would avoid supermarkets or other public gatherings,” Dr. Pena said. 

Depression and anxiety

COVID-19 doesn’t only affect people with pre-existing physical conditions—it can have a serious impact on those with mental health issues, like anxiety and depression, even if you are not infected with the coronavirus.

“Fear of the virus and all the changes it’s causing are driving anxiety levels up for everyone, but for people who have an anxiety disorder it’s so much worse,” Gail Saltz, MD, associate professor of psychiatry at the NY Presbyterian Hospital Weill-Cornell School of medicine and host of the upcoming Personology podcast from iHeartRadio, tells Health. Dr. Saltz warns that people who have managed their disorder may relapse, and those actively struggling may be much more symptomatic. 

“Anxiety also worsens depression, particularly those whose depression is of the ‘agitated’ variety, a subtype of the illness characterized by jittery, anxious, irritable behavior,” she adds. 

People with anxiety or depression who are at home with someone who has COVID-19 may find the burden of caregiving to cause their mental health to deteriorate further. “Caregiving is very stressful,” says Dr. Saltz. “In many cases it’s a 24/7 role and for those already struggling, it can be overwhelming.” She adds that social distancing, quarantining, and losing the structure of work or school can also increase symptoms of both anxiety and depression by increasing feelings of loneliness. 

By actively focusing on mental health, however, those symptoms can be reduced. Dr. Saltz recommends exercising for 30 minutes each day and trying relaxation techniques like deep breathing and mindfulness to help keep anxiety at bay.

It’s also important to have a structure in your day, even if you’re self-isolating or in quarantine, she says. This means getting up at the same time as you normally would, taking a shower, getting dressed, creating and sticking to a schedule, and maintaining normal sleep. If you work from home, make a dedicated workstation. 

If you need professional help, it’s still there for you even if you can’t get to the doctor’s office. “Most therapists are moving to online sessions to accommodate their patients,” says Dr. Saltz. If you take medication for your mental health, make sure you have a 30-day supply. 

Loneliness is an issue for people in all age groups, and even if you don’t have mental health issues yourself, you probably know someone who does. “Check in with those you know who are also self-isolating,” says Dr. Saltz says. “Talking to and supporting others is likely to make you feel better as well.” 

The information in this story is accurate as of press time. However, as the situation surrounding COVID-19 continues to evolve, it’s possible that some data have changed since publication. While Health is trying to keep our stories as up-to-date as possible, we also encourage readers to stay informed on news and recommendations for their own communities by using the CDCWHO, and their local public health department as resources.

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How To Keep Your Immune System Up

Your immune system defends you against the viruses that cause colds and flu. These eight steps can help support your immune system so it’s ready to fight those viruses.

  1. Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
  2. Get at least 30 minutes of exercise on most days of the week.
  3. Get enough sleep.
  4. Wash your hands.
  5. Keep up with your vaccinations. Almost everyone who’s at least 6 months old should get a flu vaccine every year.
  6. Keep your weight healthy.
  7. Don’t drink too much alcohol.
  8. Don’t smoke.

Get the Nutrients You Need

Food is your best source. Fill half your plate with vegetables and fruit, and split the other half between lean protein and grains, as the government’s “MyPlate” guidelines recommend.

Not sure if you’re getting enough vitamins and minerals? Ask your doctor or a nutritionist about that.

Don’t overdo supplements. Taking too much can be bad for you. Your doctor can let you know what you need.

Manage Your Stress

Everyone gets stressed. Short bursts of stress may help your immune system. But lasting stress is a problem. It can hamper your immune system.

You can take action to tame stress. Make these steps part of your stress management plan:

  • Get enough sleep.
  • Learn and use relaxation techniques.
  • Exercise.
  • Take time for yourself.
  • Build your support network of people you can talk to.
  • Consider counseling, especially when you’re going through a very stressful time.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neha Pathak, MD on0/, 018

© 2018 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved

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Kill Germs! Coronavirus, etc.

What kills coronavirus?

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has compiled a list of products that while not specifically tested on the brand-new version of the virus that causes COVID-19 just yet, have been proven effective on similar or harder-to-kill viruses, such as the rhinovirus that causes the common cold; they expect them to work on the coronavirus, too. These products use a variety of different ingredients and formulations, so be sure to use them exactly as the label directs. These products include:

  • Clorox Disinfecting Wipes
  • Clorox Clean-Up Cleaner + Bleach
  • Lysol Disinfectant Spray
  • Lysol Multi-Purpose Cleaner with Bleach
  • Lysol Multi-Purpose Cleaner with Hydrogen Peroxide
  • Purell Multi Surface Disinfectant Spray
  • Microban 24 Hour Multi-Purpose Cleaner

How to use cleaning products to kill coronavirus

Before using any disinfecting product, start by reading the label to make sure it is registered with the EPA and to see what strains of bacteria and viruses it kills. The EPA registration number can usually be found in small type on the bottom of the front or back label, and the bacteria and viruses the product is effective against are also usually listed.

EPA registration is required by law for any cleaner that claims to kill germs. It’s what we rely on in the Good Housekeeping Cleaning Lab when we evaluate sanitizing and disinfecting products and it assures you that if you follow the directions, the product will work as claimed.Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

A few more points:

  • Know that sanitizing is not the same as disinfecting. Sanitizing (reducing the number of germs) usually takes less time — sometimes just 30 or 60 seconds — while disinfecting (killing those germs) can take anywhere up to 10 minutes, depending on the product.
  • Check the label for how long hard, non-porous surfaces must stay wet for the most effective germ killing. Because liquids evaporate, this may require you to apply the product multiple times.
  • No product can adequately sanitize or disinfect a dirty surface, so make sure you clean — even with plain soap and water — before you disinfect.

What DIY household cleaner kills coronavirus?

According the the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC), an easy way to disinfect hard, non-porous surfaces with a product you likely have at home is to combine 1/3 cup of regular chlorine bleach (sodium hypochlorite) bleach per gallon of water. (Clorox recommends using 1/2 cup bleach per 1/2 gallon.) For small batches, use 4 teaspoons of regular chlorine bleach and 1 quart of water.

To use: Wearing gloves, dip a cloth into the mixture, wipe the surface, allowing the solution to contact the surface for five minutes and air dry. For food contact surfaces, like countertops and high chair trays, rinse with warm water and air dry after disinfecting. Be careful not to splash the bleach solution on your clothes or in your eyes and use it sparingly on stainless steel sinks and surfaces. It’s also important to note that the bleach and water solution needs to be made fresh each day you use it.

Does hydrogen peroxide kill viruses and bacteria?

According to the CDC, hydrogen peroxide is a stable and effective disinfectant against a wide variety of microorganisms, including bacteria and viruses, when used on hard, non-porous surfaces. Typically sold in 3% solutions, hydrogen peroxide can be used as is, directly from the bottle. It’s best to keep it away from fabrics when cleaning and to wear gloves to protect your hands.

To use: Spray or wipe it on the surface, allowing it to remain wet for at least one minute before wiping.

Will alcohol disinfect surfaces?

Isopropyl alcohol is an effective disinfectant against many pathogens, including coronavirus, as long as the concentration is 70%. Most rubbing alcohols are 70% isopropyl alcohol, but concentrations can range from 60-99%. For killing coronavirus quickly on surfaces, 70% is best — pure (100%) alcohol evaporates too quickly to be effective.

To use: Wipe or spray the surface with the alcohol and make sure it remains wet for at least 30 seconds.

Can vinegar kill germs?

No. According to the CDC and NSF (a public health and safety organization), vinegar (or vinegar-based alternative cleaning products) should not be used to disinfect or sanitize. Vinegar-containing cleaning products can be a good in some instances, but vinegar is not registered with the EPA as a disinfectant and is ineffective against most bacteria and viruses – it does not kill the flu or coronavirus. Undiluted white vinegar may work on some limited types of bacteria, but it’s not the best way to get surfaces germ-free. (Besides, coronavirus is a virus, not a bacteria.)

What else you should know about cleaning your home right now

  • Regular soap and water cleans germs away and cuts down the quantity of germs, which also reduces the chance of infection. But to actually kill germs, you also must sanitize or disinfect surfaces after cleaning them.
  • Never combine disinfecting or any cleaning products and open the window or ventilate a room if fumes become bothersome.
  • Soft surfaces are porous and will never fully reach the level of germ kill required to be fully disinfected. Some antibacterial sprays can sanitize soft surfaces, like pillows and plush toys.
  • Test surfaces for safety in a hidden spot before using alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, or any disinfectant on a surface, especially a delicate one. On food contact surfaces, rinse with clear water and dry after disinfecting, unless the product label specifically says it’s not necessary.

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home/cleaning/a31402790/what-kills-germs/

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Nighttime Yoga Poses!

10 Nighttime Yoga Poses You Can Do in Bed

Finish with the king of all relaxation yoga poses, otherwise known as Corpse Pose. Savasana helps put your body in ideal anatomical alignment to promote deep relaxation. If you haven’t fallen asleep already, this will surely send you off to dreamland.

  1. Lie flat on your bed and stack two pillows underneath your knees.
  2. Open your knees about shoulder-width apart, or as wide as you can while comfortably keeping them propped on the pillows.
  3. Stretch your arms out to your sides with palms facing up.
  4. Lift your chin slightly up to face the ceiling to allow for smooth breathing.
  5. Begin your deep breaths and don’t fight the urge to fall asleep. This is a great pose to spend the entire night in.
When you can’t seem to get the shut-eye you desperately need, try these relaxing yoga poses you can do right in bed to help you get to sleep fast.

About Jessica Gouthro

Jessica is a NASM Certified and Prenatal Certified Personal Trainer, Fitness Nutrition Specialist, and co-host of the popular YouTube show Live Lean TV. She has over 12 years of experience in fitness and nutrition coaching, and she has clients all over the world.

When she’s not shooting fitness and nutrition videos, writing workouts, creating recipes, or working with clients, she enjoys long walks on the beach, fun workouts, and spending time with her husband, dog, and baby-on-the-way!

9 Easy Yoga Poses to Reverse Bad Posture

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Benefits Of Taking Vitamin C

Important Sources of Vitamin C

The important sources of vitamin C are citrus fruits such as oranges and grapes. [1] Strawberries, raspberries, cabbages, cauliflowers, other leafy vegetables, red peppers, potatoes, broccoli, chilies, watercresses, parsley, brussels sprouts, cantaloupes, mange touts, and kiwi fruits are also rich sources of this vitamin. Cooking food at low temperatures and for a shorter period is important to keep the vitamin C preserved and beneficial.

Health Benefits of Vitamin C

The health benefits of this amazing antioxidant are explained in detail below:

Prevents Scurvy

Scurvy is caused by an insufficient intake of ascorbic acid. The symptoms of scurvy appear due to the weakening of connective tissues, bones, and blood vessels that include collagen. [2] Vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant, is required for the production of collagen.

Treats Common Cold

A 2013 report published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews suggests that ascorbic acid enhances the immune system of our body, which protects us from cold and cough. [3] The study also showed that when administered regularly, vitamin C reduces the duration of colds. Besides, it facilitates the absorption of iron and, therefore, strengthens the body’s resistance to infection. It also fights against viruses.

Lowers Hypertension

Vitamin C is one of the safest and most effective nutrients. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

People with hypertension are at high risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. According to a 2012 research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vitamin C intake helps in lowering the body’s blood pressure in the short term. [4]

Acts as a Potent Vasodilator Antioxidant

Treatment with vitamin C has effectively resulted in the proper dilation of blood vessels in the cases of atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, high cholesterol, angina pectoris, and high blood pressure. Dr. Melissa A. Moser, University of Connecticut, USA, in her 2016 report published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, carried out epidemiologic research on vitamin C to study its potential role in cardiovascular diseases. [5] Results have found that the supplements of this vitamin improve blood vessel dilation and protect cardiovascular health.

Treats Lead Toxicity

Lead toxicity is a severe health problem found mostly in children, especially in urban areas. Abnormal development and growth have been found in some children who are exposed to lead. They develop behavioral problems, learning disabilities, and also tend to have a low IQ. It may damage the kidneys and increase blood pressure in adults. [6] Vitamin C supplements can reduce the blood lead level.

Treats Cataracts (Eye Disorder)

Cataracts are the most common conditions of visual problems. A decrease in the level of vitamin C in the lens of the human eye has been found more common when cataracts are present. Excessive intake of ascorbic acid increases the blood supply to the ocular areas of the body. According to the American Optometric Association, when Vitamin C is consumed with other essential nutrients, it can slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and visual acuity loss. [7]

Anti-cancer Potential

According to the National Cancer Institute, some clinical trials have shown that when cancer patients are given a high dosage of vitamin C, they show improved quality of life and fewer side effects. [8] However, other studies say that it is better to abstain from this treatment until the effects are fully studied. [9]

Combats Stroke

Vitamin C helps in reducing the risk of stroke, a type of cardiovascular disease. A diet full of vegetables and fruits supplies a good quantity of this vitamin, which maintains an appropriate blood pressure level. [10] It also protects the body from free radicals which could be the reason for the stroke.

Improves your Mood

Vitamin C plays a key role in the production of neurotransmitters like norepinephrine. They affect the mood of a person and are critical to the proper functioning of the brain. A 2013 study  [11]conducted by Canadian researchers revealed that short-term therapy with vitamin C improves mood and reduces psychological distress in those acutely hospitalized patients with a high prevalence of suffering from hypovitaminosis.

Boosts Immunity

Immunity is another important benefit of this vitamin. Vitamin C is widely known for its contribution to the immune system and its stimulation of white blood vessels in the body. [12]

Repairs Wounds

Vitamin C helps repair wounds. It facilitates the growth of the connective tissues, which speeds up the process of healing wounds. [13]

Controls Asthma

Ascorbic acid helps reduce the symptoms of asthma. It helps to protect against the harmful effects of pollution on the human body, which often results in asthma-like symptoms. [14]EDITOR’S PICK

Manages Diabetes

According to a report [15] published by the Indian Journal of Medical Research, results show that daily intake of 1000 mg supplementary vitamin C can be beneficial in reducing blood glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes, reducing their risk of complications.

Prevents Heart Diseases

An adequate amount of ascorbic acid is essential for the protection of blood vessels from the damage that free radicals can cause them. This could be a major cause of a heart disease called atherosclerosis. [16] Vitamin C acts as a preventative agent against this heart disease, as well as various other cardiac problems.


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Mental Health~ How To Avoid Depression

Get Moving

When loneliness sets in, the feeling can weigh heavily on your entire body. Whenever this feeling starts to overtake you, fight back and get productive. Whether it is going on a walk, browsing your favorite store, or even picking up around the house, moving about and engaging in other tasks will help to distract you and may offer some relief. It is about taking small steps to get to where you need to be, so anything you can do to push yourself away from these thoughts of isolation will help.

Picture Your Loneliness

Sometimes, people find that picturing their depression or feelings of isolation as something separate from them (such as a cloud or something similar) helps them feel more control over it. These feelings are then seen as something that you can walk away from or have the choice to ignore. It also allows you the knowledge that these feelings are not who you are. You are whoever you choose to be and you have control over how you want to feel.

Reach Out To Someone

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Talking about things that you are struggling with can be a huge challenge. It is not easy but can be an extremely helpful step in getting back to your happy self. You never know who you may able to relate to through this process. Many who end up opening up about their problems find themselves surprised as to how many others have gone through (or are currently going through) the same thing. You may end up helping someone you did not even realize was struggling and who was afraid to reach out themselves.

Visit A Furry Friend

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Animals can make great companions for those feeling more secluded in life. Dogs especially are naturally social and instinctively want to protect those that they know are struggling. Visit a shelter or pet shop and make some new furry friends. If you are up for it, consider adopting your own pet. Cats, fish, and dogs all make great additions to any household and offer you something to love and care for. They also allow something else to focus on, other than your feelings of isolation.

Set New Goals

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By making plans and setting goals, you give yourself something to strive for. Start off slow so that you do not overwhelm yourself. Setting just one or two goals for the day is a great way to start fighting back. Some ideas might be to call up a friend you have not spoken to for a while or go to a coffee shop for an hour. The next day, go grocery shopping, then make yourself one meal. Make them realistic and simple. Once completed, you will have allowed yourself a sense of accomplishment, knowing that you are fighting back one step at a time.

Start Journaling

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If you are feeling up to it, go to a bookstore and spend some time picking out a journal that you love. When you get back home, make it a goal to write in it a few times a week. Getting your thoughts down on paper can help you look at them from a new perspective. It helps to clarify your emotions, allowing you to know yourself better and may help guide you in overcoming your struggles. Allowing yourself time to reflect and express can make a huge difference in how you approach life.

Thank you for reading 🙂