Category: Mediterranean Diet

Mediterranean-Keto Effects on Cognition

Mediterranean-Keto Diet’s Surprising Effect On Cognitive Function

Kristine Arbolario

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/nutrition/mediterranean-keto-diets-surprising-effect-on-cognitive-function/ar-AAGTsQI?ocid=spartanntp

A study initiated by the researchers from Wake Forest School of Medicine found a number of distinct gut microbiome in participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and its bacterial resemblance with the markers of Alzheimer’s disease.

a bowl of food on a table: Keto diet for beginners

© Twitter Keto diet for beginners

The scientists delved further by studying 17 adults, where 11 of the participants are diagnosed with MCI and six with normal cognition. They randomly appointed the subjects with a diet to observe in a span of six weeks – either the Mediterranean-ketogenic diet or the diet low in fat, high in carbohydrate.

The two groups would then switch diets after the given period for another six weeks.

The study aimed to show whether a Mediterranean-ketogenic diet could change the gut microbiome in order to increase cognitive function and lessen the Alzheimer’s markers.

After 12 weeks, they found that the Mediterranean-ketogenic diet really caused changes in the gut microbiome tied with a decreased level of markers of Alzheimer’s within both groups of adults.

Moreover, not only did the diet benefited the group of people diagnosed with MCI, but it also lessened Alzheimer’s markers in the study group with normal cognition.

In a news release, Hariom Yadav, PhD, co-author of the study, said that their findings supply important information that interventional and clinical studies in the future can refer to.

“Determining the specific role these gut microbiome signatures have in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease could lead to novel nutritional and therapeutic approaches that would be effective against the disease,” Yadav said.

The combination of the Mediterranean and keto diets seem to greatly influence an individual’s cognitive function as well as reduce the risk of having Alzheimer’s as the study showed.

Food sources of the newly found meal plan that could alter the microbiomes in your gut and improve your cognition include seafoods, poultry and eggs, olive oil, leafy greens, avocados, tomatoes and common Mediterranean flavorings such as paprika, cumin, cinnamon, oregano, etc.

You can also eat nuts and seeds, high-fat dairies, low-carb fruits like berries and red meat but only in moderation, and limit intake of common keto food sources to help lower LDL cholesterol, such as coconut oil, butter, heavy cream and fatty cuts of red meat.

If possible, avoid foods such as grains, legumes, sugar, tubers and some fruits like apples, bananas and oranges.

Thank you for reading 🙂

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Ways To Follow The Mediterranean Diet

1. Switch Up Your Oil

olive oil

If you’ve been cooking with vegetable oil or coconut oil, make the switch to extra-virgin olive oil. Olive oil is rich in monounsaturated fatty acids which may improve HDL cholesterol, the “good” type of cholesterol. HDL cholesterol ferries “bad” LDL particles out of arteries, according to a 2017 study in Circulation. Use olive oil in homemade salad dressings and vinaigrettes. Drizzle it on finished dishes like fish or chicken to boost flavor. Swap butter for olive oil in mashed potatoes, pasta, and more.

2. Eat More Fish

olive oil

Featured Recipe: Plank-Grilled Miso Salmon

The go-to protein in the Mediterranean diet is fish. In particular, this diet emphasizes fatty fish like salmon, sardines, and mackerel. These fish are rich in heart- and brain-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Even those fish that are leaner and have less fat (like cod or tilapia) are still worth it, as they provide a good source of protein. If you currently don’t get a lot of fish in your diet, an easy point of entry is to designate one day each week as “fish” night. Cooking fish in parchment paper or foil packets is one no-fuss, no-mess way to put dinner on the table. Or try incorporating it in some of your favorite foods, like tacos, stir-frys, and soups.

3. Eat Veggies All Day Long

olive oil

Featured Recipe: Baked Vegetable Soup

If you look at your diet and worry that there’s barely a green to be seen, this is the perfect opportunity to fit in more veggies. A good way to do this is to eat one serving at snacktime, like crunching on bell pepper strips or throwing a handful of spinach into a smoothie), and one at dinner, like these quick and easy side dishes. Aim for at least two servings per day. More is better. At least three servings can help you bust stress, Australian research notes.

4. Help Yourself to Whole Grains

olive oil

Featured Recipe: Mediterranean Chickpea Quinoa Bowl

Experiment with “real” whole grains that are still in their “whole” form and haven’t been refined. Quinoa cooks up in just 20 minutes, making it a great side dish for weeknight meals. Barley is full of fiber and it’s filling: pair it with mushrooms for a steamy, satisfying soup. A hot bowl of oatmeal is perfect for breakfast on a cold winter morning. Even popcorn is a whole grain—just keep it healthy by eating air-popped corn and forgo the butter (try a drizzle of olive oil instead). Supplement your intake with other whole-grain products, like whole-wheat bread and pasta. Look for the term “whole” or “whole grain” on the food package and in the ingredient list—it should be listed as the first ingredient. But if you still find it too hard to make the switch from your old refined favorites, phase in a whole grain by using whole-grain blends of pastas and rice or mixing whole grains half-and-half with a refined one (like half whole-wheat pasta and half white).

5. Snack on Nuts

olive oil

Featured Recipe: Tropical Fruit & Nuts Snack

Nuts are another Mediterranean diet staple. Grabbing a handful, whether that’s almonds, cashews, or pistachios, can make for a satisfying, on-the-go snack. One study in Nutrition Journal found that if people replaced their standard snack (cookies, chips, crackers, snack mix, cereal bars) with almonds, their diets would be lower in empty calories, added sugar, and sodium. Plus, nuts contain more fiber and minerals, such as potassium, than processed snack foods.

6. Enjoy Fruit for Dessert

olive oil

Featured Recipe: Red Fruit Salad

Generally a good source of fiber, vitamin C and antioxidants, fresh fruit is a healthy way to indulge your sweet tooth. If it helps you to eat more, add a little sugar—drizzle slices of pear with honey or sprinkle a little brown sugar on grapefruit. Keep fresh fruit visible at home and keep a piece or two at work so you have a healthful snack when your stomach starts growling. Lots of grocery stores stock exotic fruit—pick a new one to try each week and expand your fruit horizons.

7. Sip (a Little) Wine

olive oil

The people who live along the Mediterranean—the Spanish, Italian, French, Greek, and others—are not known to shy away from wine, but that doesn’t mean you should pour it at your leisure. Dietitians and experts who developed the Mediterranean diet for the New England Journal of Medicine study advised women to stick to a three-ounce serving and men, a five-ounce serving, per day. When you do sip, try to do so with a meal—even better if that meal is shared with loved ones. If you’re a teetotaler, you shouldn’t start to drink just for this diet.

8. Savor Every Bite

olive oil

http://www.eatingwell.com/article/16372/8-ways-to-follow-the-mediterranean-diet-for-better-health/

Thank you for reading 🙂

Mediterranean Pasta Salad

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons plain hummus
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup chopped red bell pepper Red and Yellow Field Bell ½ cup canned quartered artichoke hearts, drained and cut in half
  • 1 cup lightly packed baby kale
  • 4 pitted Kalamata olives, roughly chopped
  • 1 (3 ounce) can no-salt-added light tuna in water, drained
  • ½ cup cooked farfalle, preferably whole-wheat
  • 1 tablespoon crumbled feta cheese
  • 1 tablespoon toasted chopped walnuts
  • Juice from ¼ lemon (optional)

Preparation

  1. Whisk hummus and water in a small bowl. Set aside.
  2. Heat oil in a medium nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add bell pepper; cook for 1 minute. Add artichoke hearts, kale, and olives. Gently stir in tuna, trying not to not break up large pieces; cook until the tuna is warmed, about 1 minute more. Stir in pasta. Remove from heat and toss with the hummus sauce. Top with feta and walnuts and drizzle with lemon juice, if desired.
  • To make ahead: Cook pasta up to 1 day ahead and refrigerate.
Mediterranean Pasta Salad
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/273195/mediterranean-pasta-salad/

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One Day Of Mediterranean Diet Plan

Breakfast

Breakfast (280 calories)

• 1 serving Fig & Ricotta Toast
• 1 cup of coffee with 1/4 cup steamed milk

A.M. Snack

A.M. Snack (101 calories)

• 1 medium pear

Lunch

Lunch (371 calories)

• 1 serving Edamame & Chicken Greek Salad (2 3/4 cup)
• 1 clementine

P.M. Snack

P.M. Snack (177 calories)

• 1 4-inch whole-wheat pita bread, toasted
• 3 Tbsp. hummus drizzled with 1 tsp. olive oil

Dinner

Dinner (563 calories)

• 1 serving Dijon Salmon with Green Bean Pilaf
• 5 oz. glass of Pinot Noir, or Chardonnay


http://www.eatingwell.com/article/289833/1-day-mediterranean-diet-meal-plan/


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