February 22 2019

Word of the Week

minion

 

noun MIN-yun

Definition

1 : a servile dependent, follower, or underling

2 : one highly favored : idol

3 : a subordinate or petty official

Did You Know?

Minion comes to us from Middle French and has a somewhat surprising cousin in English: filet mignon. The two words are connected by way of Middle French mignon, meaning “darling.” Minionentered English around 1500 directly from Middle French, whereas filet mignon arrived significantly later by way of a modern French phrase meaning “dainty fillet.” The earliest uses of minion referred to someone who was a particular favorite, or darling, of a sovereign or other important personage. Over time, however, the word developed a more derogatory sense referring to a person who is servile and unimportant.

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February 19 2019

Word Of The Week

ob·fus·cate
[ˈäbfəˌskāt]

VERB
obfuscates (third person present) · obfuscated (past tense) · obfuscated (past participle) · obfuscating (present participle)
render obscure, unclear, or unintelligible.
“the spelling changes will deform some familiar words and obfuscate their etymological origins”
synonyms:
obscure · confuse · make obscure/unclear · blur · muddle · jumble · complicate · garble · muddy · cloud · befog · muddy the waters
antonyms:
clarify
bewilder (someone).
“it is more likely to obfuscate people than enlighten them”
synonyms:
bewilder · mystify · puzzle · perplex · baffle · confound · bemuse · befuddle · nonplus · flummox · wilder · maze · gravel

ORIGIN
late Middle English: from late Latin obfuscat- ‘darkened’, from the verb obfuscare, based on Latin fuscus ‘dark’.

February 13 2019

Word of the Week

thes·pi·an[ˈTHespēən]

ADJECTIVE relating to drama and the theater. “thespian

talents”

synonyms:

stage · dramatic · thespian · dramaturgical · show-business · showbiz · histrionic · theatric

NOUN  thespians (plural noun) an actor or actress.

synonyms:

entertainer · performer · trouper · showman · artist · player · musician · singer · dancer · actor · actress · thespian · comic · comedian · comedienne · clown · impressionist · mime artist · conjuror · magician · acrobat · star · superstar · executant

ORIGIN late 17th century: from the name Thespis + -ian.

February 7 2019

Word of the Week

ob·fus·cate
[ˈäbfəˌskāt]

VERB
obfuscates (third person present) · obfuscated (past tense) · obfuscated (past participle) · obfuscating (present participle)
render obscure, unclear, or unintelligible.
“the spelling changes will deform some familiar words and obfuscate their etymological origins”
synonyms:
obscure · confuse · make obscure/unclear · blur · muddle · jumble · complicate · garble · muddy · cloud · befog · muddy the waters
antonyms:
clarify
bewilder (someone).
“it is more likely to obfuscate people than enlighten them”
synonyms:
bewilder · mystify · puzzle · perplex · baffle · confound · bemuse · befuddle · nonplus · flummox · wilder · maze · gravel

ORIGIN
late Middle English: from late Latin obfuscat- ‘darkened’, from the verb obfuscare, based on Latin fuscus ‘dark’.

February 1 2019

Word of the Week

ei·do·lon

[īˈdōlən]

NOUN
literary
eidola (plural noun) · eidolons (plural noun)
  1. an idealized person or thing.
  2. a specter or phantom.
    synonyms:
    specter · phantom · wraith · spirit · soul · shadow · presence · vision · apparition · hallucination · bodach · Doppelgänger · duppy · spook · phantasm · shade · revenant · visitant · wight · eidolon · manes · lemures
ORIGIN
early 19th century: from Greek eidōlon, from eidos ‘form’.
January 25 2019

Word of the week

con·stel·late

[ˈkänstəlāt]

VERB
literary
constellates (third person present) · constellated (past tense) · constellated (past participle) · constellating (present participle)
  1. form or cause to form into a cluster or group; gather together.
    “the towns and valleys where people constellate” · “their stories were never constellated”
ORIGIN
mid 17th century: from late Latin constellatus, from con- ‘together’ + stellatus ‘arranged like a star’.
January 9 2019

Word of the week

adult art conceptual dark
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

vex

[veks]

VERB
vexes (third person present) · vexed (past tense) · vexed (past participle) · vexing (present participle)
  1. make (someone) feel annoyed, frustrated, or worried, especially with trivial matters.
    “the memory of the conversation still vexed him”
ORIGIN
late Middle English: from Old French vexer, from Latin vexare ‘shake, disturb’.

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