February 19 2019

Word Of The Week

ob·fus·cate
[ˈäbfəˌskāt]

VERB
obfuscates (third person present) · obfuscated (past tense) · obfuscated (past participle) · obfuscating (present participle)
render obscure, unclear, or unintelligible.
“the spelling changes will deform some familiar words and obfuscate their etymological origins”
synonyms:
obscure · confuse · make obscure/unclear · blur · muddle · jumble · complicate · garble · muddy · cloud · befog · muddy the waters
antonyms:
clarify
bewilder (someone).
“it is more likely to obfuscate people than enlighten them”
synonyms:
bewilder · mystify · puzzle · perplex · baffle · confound · bemuse · befuddle · nonplus · flummox · wilder · maze · gravel

ORIGIN
late Middle English: from late Latin obfuscat- ‘darkened’, from the verb obfuscare, based on Latin fuscus ‘dark’.

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February 7 2019

Word of the Week

ob·fus·cate
[ˈäbfəˌskāt]

VERB
obfuscates (third person present) · obfuscated (past tense) · obfuscated (past participle) · obfuscating (present participle)
render obscure, unclear, or unintelligible.
“the spelling changes will deform some familiar words and obfuscate their etymological origins”
synonyms:
obscure · confuse · make obscure/unclear · blur · muddle · jumble · complicate · garble · muddy · cloud · befog · muddy the waters
antonyms:
clarify
bewilder (someone).
“it is more likely to obfuscate people than enlighten them”
synonyms:
bewilder · mystify · puzzle · perplex · baffle · confound · bemuse · befuddle · nonplus · flummox · wilder · maze · gravel

ORIGIN
late Middle English: from late Latin obfuscat- ‘darkened’, from the verb obfuscare, based on Latin fuscus ‘dark’.

January 25 2019

Word of the week

con·stel·late

[ˈkänstəlāt]

VERB
literary
constellates (third person present) · constellated (past tense) · constellated (past participle) · constellating (present participle)
  1. form or cause to form into a cluster or group; gather together.
    “the towns and valleys where people constellate” · “their stories were never constellated”
ORIGIN
mid 17th century: from late Latin constellatus, from con- ‘together’ + stellatus ‘arranged like a star’.
January 9 2019

Word of the week

adult art conceptual dark
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

vex

[veks]

VERB
vexes (third person present) · vexed (past tense) · vexed (past participle) · vexing (present participle)
  1. make (someone) feel annoyed, frustrated, or worried, especially with trivial matters.
    “the memory of the conversation still vexed him”
ORIGIN
late Middle English: from Old French vexer, from Latin vexare ‘shake, disturb’.
December 27 2018

Word of the Week

sub·li·mate

[sublimate]

VERB
sublimates (third person present) · sublimated (past tense) · sublimated (past participle) · sublimating (present participle)
  1. (in psychoanalytic theory) divert or modify (an instinctual impulse) into a culturally higher or socially more acceptable activity.
    “libido must be sublimated into productive work activities” · “he sublimates his hurt and anger into humor”
    synonyms:
    channel · control · divert · transfer · redirect · convert · refine · purify · transmute
  2. chemistry
    another term for sublime.
NOUN
chemistry
sublimates (plural noun)
  1. a solid deposit of a substance which has sublimed.
ORIGIN
late Middle English (in the sense ‘raise to a higher status’): from Latin sublimat- ‘raised up’, from the verb sublimare.
October 25 2018

Word of the Day

fore·shad·ow
[fôrˈSHadō]

Definition of foreshadow
transitive verb
: to represent, indicate, or typify beforehand : prefigure
The hero’s predicament is foreshadowed in the first chapter.

VERB
foreshadows (third person present) · foreshadowed (past tense) · foreshadowed (past participle) · foreshadowing (present participle)
be a warning or indication of (a future event).
“it foreshadowed my preoccupation with jazz”
synonyms:
augur · presage · portend · prognosticate · foreshow · foretell · indicate · suggest · signal · herald · forewarn · warn of · promise · point to · anticipate · forebode · foretoken · betoken · harbinger · prefigure

September 26 2018

WORD OF THE DAY

nature summer yellow animal
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

CATERWAUL-

cat·er·waul
[ˈkadərˌwôl]

VERB
caterwauls (third person present) · caterwauled (past tense) · caterwauled (past participle) · caterwauling (present participle)
  1. make a shrill howling or wailing noise like that of a cat.
    “he seems to think that singing soulfully is to whine and caterwaul tunelessly” · “the caterwauling of a pair of bobcats” · “a caterwauling guitar”
    synonyms: howl · howling · wail · wailing · screech · screeching · shriek · shrieking · scream · screaming · bawl · bawling · cry · crying · yell · yelling · yelp · yelping · yowl · yowling · squall · squalling · whine · whining · ululating · miaowing · miaow · howl · wail · bawl · cry · yell · scream · screech · yelp · yowl · squall · whine · miaow · ululate
NOUN
caterwauls (plural noun)
  1. a shrill howling or wailing noise.
    “the song ended in a caterwaul of feedback”
    synonyms: yell · cry · call · roar · howl · bellow · bawl · clamor · bay · cheer · yawp · yelp · wail · squawk · shriek · scream · screech · squeal · squall · caterwaul · whoop · holler · vociferation
    antonyms: whisper
ORIGIN
late Middle English: from cat1 + imitative waul.

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