Word of the week

sen·tient

/ˈsen(t)SH(ē)ənt/

adjective

adjective: sentient

  1. able to perceive or feel things.

    “she had been instructed from birth in the equality of all sentient life forms”

    synonyms: (capable of) feeling, livinglive;More

    consciousawareresponsivereactive


    “any sentient creature should have the good sense to avoid something so dangerous”

Origin

early 17th century: from Latin sentient- ‘feeling,’ from the verb sentire .

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Word of the Week

white ceramic teacup with saucer near two books above gray floral textile

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book·ish
[ˈbo͝okiSH]

ADJECTIVE
(of a person or way of life) devoted to reading and studying rather than worldly interests.
“by comparison I was very bookish, intellectual, and wordy in a wrong way”
synonyms:
studious · scholarly · academic · literary · intellectual · highbrow · erudite · learned · well read · widely read · educated · well educated · well informed · knowledgeable · cultured · accomplished · pedantic · pedagogical · donnish · bluestocking · cerebral · serious · earnest · thoughtful · impractical · ivory-towerish · brainy · egghead · lettered · clerkly
antonyms:
lowbrow
(of language or writing) literary in style or allusion.
“long bookish scholarship” · “a bookish but eloquent erotic memoir”

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pumpkin basket

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wraith
[rāTH]

NOUN
wraiths (plural noun)
a ghost or ghostlike image of someone, especially one seen shortly before or after their death.
synonyms:
ghost · specter · spirit · phantom · apparition · manifestation · vision · shadow · presence · poltergeist · supernatural being · bodach · duppy · spook · shade · visitant · revenant · phantasm · wight · eidolon · manes · lemures
used in reference to a pale, thin, or insubstantial person or thing.
“heart attacks had reduced his mother to a wraith”
literary
a wisp or faint trace of something.
“a sea breeze was sending a gray wraith of smoke up the slopes”

ORIGIN
early 16th century (originally Scots): of unknown origin.

WORD OF THE DAY

fiend
[fēnd]

NOUN
fiends (plural noun)
an evil spirit or demon.
synonyms:
demon · devil · evil spirit · imp · bogie · incubus · succubus · hellhound · spook · cacodemon
archaic
(the fiend)
the Devil.
a wicked or cruel person.
“a fiend thirsty for blood and revenge”

 
synonyms:
brute · beast · villain · barbarian · monster · ogre · sadist · evil-doer · baddie · swine · blackguard
informal
a person who is excessively fond of or addicted to something.
“the restaurant’s owner is a wine fiend”
synonyms:
enthusiast · fanatic · maniac · addict · devotee · fan · lover · follower · aficionado · connoisseur · appreciator · buff · freak · nut · ham · sucker · great one

ORIGIN
Old English fēond ‘an enemy, the devil, a demon’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vijand and German Feind ‘enemy’.

Word of the Day

fore·shad·ow
[fôrˈSHadō]

Definition of foreshadow
transitive verb
: to represent, indicate, or typify beforehand : prefigure
The hero’s predicament is foreshadowed in the first chapter.

VERB
foreshadows (third person present) · foreshadowed (past tense) · foreshadowed (past participle) · foreshadowing (present participle)
be a warning or indication of (a future event).
“it foreshadowed my preoccupation with jazz”
synonyms:
augur · presage · portend · prognosticate · foreshow · foretell · indicate · suggest · signal · herald · forewarn · warn of · promise · point to · anticipate · forebode · foretoken · betoken · harbinger · prefigure

Word of the day

Word of the Day :

ambivalent

adjective am-BIV-uh-lu
Definition
: having or showing simultaneous and contradictory attitudes or feelings toward something : characterized by ambivalence

Did You Know?
The words ambivalent and ambivalence entered English during the early 20th century in the field of psychology. They came to us through the International Scientific Vocabulary, a set of words common to people of science who speak different languages. The prefix ambi- means “both,” and the -valent and -valence parts ultimately derive from the Latin verb valēre, meaning “to be strong.” Not surprisingly, an ambivalent person is someone who has strong feelings on more than one side of a question or issue.

 

Examples
Bianca was ambivalent about starting her first year away at college—excited for the new opportunities that awaited but sad to leave her friends and family back home.
“A new study from LinkedIn found that many people feel ambivalent in their careers—wondering if they should stay in the same job or take time to invest in learning new skills or even change to a new path altogether.” — Shelcy V. Joseph, Forbes, 3 Sept. 2018

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in·fran·gi·ble
[inˈfranjəbəl]

ADJECTIVE
formal
unbreakable; inviolable.
“there is no infrangible genetic prescription of human behavior”
synonyms:
unbreakable · shatterproof · nonbreakable · toughened · sturdy · stout · hardwearing · heavy-duty · resistant · durable · lasting · made to last · enduring · everlasting · perennial · deathless · undying · immortal · endless · inextinguishable · imperishable · ineradicable · long-lasting · adamantine · infrangible
antonyms:
fragile · ephemeral

ORIGIN
late 16th century: from French, or from medieval Latin infrangibilis, from in- ‘not’ + frangibilis ( see frangible).