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Word of the Week

Nascent

Nas•cent

/ˈnāsənt,ˈnasənt/

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adjectiveadjective: nascent

  1. (especially of a process or organization) just coming into existence and beginning to display signs of future potential.”the nascent space industry”synonyms:just beginning, budding, developing, growing, embryonic, incipient, young, in its infancy, fledgling, evolving, emergent, emerging, rising, dawning, advancing, burgeoning;rarenaissant”the nascent economic recovery”
    • CHEMISTRY(chiefly of hydrogen) freshly generated in a reactive form.

Origin

early 17th century: from Latin nascent- ‘being born’, from the verb nasci .

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Word of the Day

Mirific

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mirific

adjective

mi·​rif·​ic | \(ˈ)mī¦rifik\
variants: or less commonly mirifical \ -​fə̇kəl \
Definition of mirific
: working wonders : marvelous

his mirific adventures
— W. J. Locke

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Word of the day

pumpkin basket
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wraith
[rāTH]

NOUN
wraiths (plural noun)
a ghost or ghostlike image of someone, especially one seen shortly before or after their death.
synonyms:
ghost · specter · spirit · phantom · apparition · manifestation · vision · shadow · presence · poltergeist · supernatural being · bodach · duppy · spook · shade · visitant · revenant · phantasm · wight · eidolon · manes · lemures
used in reference to a pale, thin, or insubstantial person or thing.
“heart attacks had reduced his mother to a wraith”
literary
a wisp or faint trace of something.
“a sea breeze was sending a gray wraith of smoke up the slopes”

ORIGIN
early 16th century (originally Scots): of unknown origin.

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Word of the Day

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ap·pa·ri·tion
[ˌapəˈriSH(ə)n]

NOUN
apparitions (plural noun)
a ghost or ghostlike image of a person.
synonyms:
ghost · phantom · specter · spirit · wraith · shadow · presence · vision · hallucination · bodach · Doppelgänger · duppy · spook · phantasm · shade · revenant · visitant · wight · eidolon · manes
the appearance of something remarkable or unexpected, typically an image of this type.
“twentieth-century apparitions of the Virgin”
synonyms:
appearance · manifestation · materialization · emergence · visitation · arrival · advent

ORIGIN
late Middle English (in the sense ‘the action of appearing’): from Latin apparitio(n-) ‘attendance’, from the verb apparere ( see appear).

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Word of the day

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ser·pen·tine
[ˈsərpənˌtēn, ˈsərpənˌtīn]

ADJECTIVE
of or like a serpent or snake.
“serpentine coils”
winding and twisting like a snake.
“serpentine country lanes”

 
synonyms
winding · windy · zigzag · zigzagging · twisting · twisty · turning · meandering · curving · sinuous · snaking · snaky · tortuous · anfractuous · flexuous · meandrous · serpentiform
antonyms:
straight
complex, cunning, or treacherous.
“his charm was too subtle and serpentine for me”
synonyms:
complicated · intricate · complex · involved · tortuous · convoluted · tangled · elaborate · knotty · confusing · bewildering · baffling · inextricable · entangled · impenetrable · Byzantine · Daedalian · Gordian · involute · involuted
antonyms:
straightforward · simple
NOUN
a dark green mineral consisting of hydrated magnesium silicate, sometimes mottled or spotted like a snake’s skin.
a riding exercise consisting of a series of half-circles made alternately to right and left.
historical
a kind of cannon, used especially in the 15th and 16th centuries.
VERB
serpentines (third person present) · serpentined (past tense) · serpentined (past participle) · serpentining (present participle)
move or lie in a winding path or line.
“fresh tire tracks serpentined back toward the hopper”

ORIGIN
late Middle English: via Old French from late Latin serpentinus ( see serpent).

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Word of the day

quip

noun

Definition
1 a : a clever usually taunting remark : gibe
b : a witty or funny observation or response usually made on the spur of the moment
2 : quibble, equivocation
3 : something strange, droll, curious, or eccentric : oddity

Did You Know?
Quip is an abbreviation of quippy, a noun that is no longer in use. Etymologists believe that quippyderived from the Latin quippe, a word meaning “indeed” or “to be sure” that was often used ironically. The earliest sense of quip, referring to a cutting or sarcastic remark, was common for approximately a century after it first appeared in print in the early 1500s. It then fell out of use until the beginning of the 19th century, when it underwent a revival that continues to the present day.
Examples
To almost every comment I made, Adam responded with a quip and a smile.
“The cancellation of the CW network’s ‘Veronica Mars’ after three precious, ratings-starved seasons was a TV tragedy. Viewers reluctantly moved on, but we did not forget the girl who was quick with a quip, and perhaps even quicker with a taser.” — Karla Peterson, The San Diego Union Tribune, 25 Aug. 2018

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Word of the day

Word of the Day : October 9, 2018

ambivalent

adjective am-BIV-uh-lunt
Definition
: having or showing simultaneous and contradictory attitudes or feelings toward something : characterized by ambivalence

Did You Know?
The words ambivalent and ambivalence entered English during the early 20th century in the field of psychology. They came to us through the International Scientific Vocabulary, a set of words common to people of science who speak different languages. The prefix ambi- means “both,” and the -valent and -valence parts ultimately derive from the Latin verb valēre, meaning “to be strong.” Not surprisingly, an ambivalent person is someone who has strong feelings on more than one side of a question or issue.

 

Examples
Bianca was ambivalent about starting her first year away at college—excited for the new opportunities that awaited but sad to leave her friends and family back home.
“A new study from LinkedIn found that many people feel ambivalent in their careers—wondering if they should stay in the same job or take time to invest in learning new skills or even change to a new path altogether.” — Shelcy V. Joseph, Forbes, 3 Sept. 2018

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Word of the day

 

philomath

Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

philomath

(ˈfɪləˌmæθ)

n

a person who enjoys learning new facts and acquiring new knowledge
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
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Noun 1. philomath – a lover of learning

bookman, scholar, scholarly person, student – a learned person (especially in the humanities); someone who by long study has gained mastery in one or more disciplines
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

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