March 6 2019

Word of the Week

abecedarian 

adjective | ay-bee-see-DAIR-ee-un  
Definition
 
1: a: of or relating to the alphabet
  b : alphabetically arranged
  2: rudimentary
Did You Know?
 
The history of abecedarian is as simple as ABC—literally. The term’s Late Latin ancestor, abecedārius (which meant “alphabetical”), was created as a combination of the letters A, B, C, and D, plus the adjective suffix -arius; you can hear the echo of that origin in the pronunciation of the English term (think “ABC-darian”). In its oldest documented English uses in the early 1600s, abecedarian was a noun meaning “one learning the rudiments of something”; it specifically referred to someone who was learning the alphabet. The adjective began appearing in English texts a few decades after the noun.
Examples of ABECEDARIAN
 
The children recited an abecedarian chant, beginning with “A is for apple” and ending with “Z is for zebra.”   “Aficionados of Sue Grafton’s popular detective novels starring Kinsey Millhone will not be disappointed by S is for Silence, Grafton’s 19th book in her abecedarian series launched in 1982 with A is for Alibi.” — Jan Collins, The State (Columbia, South Carolina), 11 Dec. 2005
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November 15 2018

Word of the week

sen·tient

/ˈsen(t)SH(ē)ənt/

adjective

adjective: sentient

  1. able to perceive or feel things.

    “she had been instructed from birth in the equality of all sentient life forms”

    synonyms: (capable of) feeling, livinglive;More

    consciousawareresponsivereactive


    “any sentient creature should have the good sense to avoid something so dangerous”

Origin

early 17th century: from Latin sentient- ‘feeling,’ from the verb sentire .

November 10 2018

Word of the Week

white ceramic teacup with saucer near two books above gray floral textile
Photo by Thought Catalog on Pexels.com

book·ish
[ˈbo͝okiSH]

ADJECTIVE
(of a person or way of life) devoted to reading and studying rather than worldly interests.
“by comparison I was very bookish, intellectual, and wordy in a wrong way”
synonyms:
studious · scholarly · academic · literary · intellectual · highbrow · erudite · learned · well read · widely read · educated · well educated · well informed · knowledgeable · cultured · accomplished · pedantic · pedagogical · donnish · bluestocking · cerebral · serious · earnest · thoughtful · impractical · ivory-towerish · brainy · egghead · lettered · clerkly
antonyms:
lowbrow
(of language or writing) literary in style or allusion.
“long bookish scholarship” · “a bookish but eloquent erotic memoir”

October 22 2018

Word of the day

Word of the Day :

ambivalent

adjective am-BIV-uh-lu
Definition
: having or showing simultaneous and contradictory attitudes or feelings toward something : characterized by ambivalence

Did You Know?
The words ambivalent and ambivalence entered English during the early 20th century in the field of psychology. They came to us through the International Scientific Vocabulary, a set of words common to people of science who speak different languages. The prefix ambi- means “both,” and the -valent and -valence parts ultimately derive from the Latin verb valēre, meaning “to be strong.” Not surprisingly, an ambivalent person is someone who has strong feelings on more than one side of a question or issue.

 

Examples
Bianca was ambivalent about starting her first year away at college—excited for the new opportunities that awaited but sad to leave her friends and family back home.
“A new study from LinkedIn found that many people feel ambivalent in their careers—wondering if they should stay in the same job or take time to invest in learning new skills or even change to a new path altogether.” — Shelcy V. Joseph, Forbes, 3 Sept. 2018

October 20 2018

Word of the day

orange rope wrapped brown wood log
Photo by Susanne Jutzeler on Pexels.com

in·fran·gi·ble
[inˈfranjəbəl]

ADJECTIVE
formal
unbreakable; inviolable.
“there is no infrangible genetic prescription of human behavior”
synonyms:
unbreakable · shatterproof · nonbreakable · toughened · sturdy · stout · hardwearing · heavy-duty · resistant · durable · lasting · made to last · enduring · everlasting · perennial · deathless · undying · immortal · endless · inextinguishable · imperishable · ineradicable · long-lasting · adamantine · infrangible
antonyms:
fragile · ephemeral

ORIGIN
late 16th century: from French, or from medieval Latin infrangibilis, from in- ‘not’ + frangibilis ( see frangible).

October 19 2018

Word of the day

addiction aid bottle capsule
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

lenitive

len·i·tive
[ˈlenədiv]

ADJECTIVE
(of a medicine) laxative.
synonyms:
soothing · alleviating · sedative · calmative · calming · alleviative · alleviatory · lenitive · demulcent · assuasive · mitigatory · mitigative · paregoric
NOUN
lenitives (plural noun)
a laxative.
synonyms:
painkiller · analgesic · pain reliever · sedative · tranquilizer · anodyne · calmative · opiate · bromide · lenitive · demulcent · mitigative · paregoric

ORIGIN
late Middle English: from medieval Latin lenitivus, from lenit- ‘softened’, from the verb lenire.

October 18 2018

Word Of The Day

sa·lu·bri·ous
[səˈlo͞obrēəs]

ADJECTIVE
health-giving; healthy.
“salubrious weather”
synonyms:
healthy · health-giving · healthful · beneficial · good for one’s health · wholesome · salutary
antonyms:
unhealthy
(of a place) pleasant; not run-down.
synonyms:
pleasant · agreeable · nice · select · upmarket · high-class · leafy · fashionable · expensive · luxurious · grand · fancy · posh · swanky · plushy · classy · glitzy · swish · swank
antonyms:
unpleasant · downmarket

ORIGIN
mid 16th century: from Latin salubris (from salus ‘health’) + -ous.

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