February 19 2019

Word Of The Week

ob·fus·cate
[ˈäbfəˌskāt]

VERB
obfuscates (third person present) · obfuscated (past tense) · obfuscated (past participle) · obfuscating (present participle)
render obscure, unclear, or unintelligible.
“the spelling changes will deform some familiar words and obfuscate their etymological origins”
synonyms:
obscure · confuse · make obscure/unclear · blur · muddle · jumble · complicate · garble · muddy · cloud · befog · muddy the waters
antonyms:
clarify
bewilder (someone).
“it is more likely to obfuscate people than enlighten them”
synonyms:
bewilder · mystify · puzzle · perplex · baffle · confound · bemuse · befuddle · nonplus · flummox · wilder · maze · gravel

ORIGIN
late Middle English: from late Latin obfuscat- ‘darkened’, from the verb obfuscare, based on Latin fuscus ‘dark’.

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February 13 2019

Word of the Week

thes·pi·an[ˈTHespēən]

ADJECTIVE relating to drama and the theater. “thespian

talents”

synonyms:

stage · dramatic · thespian · dramaturgical · show-business · showbiz · histrionic · theatric

NOUN  thespians (plural noun) an actor or actress.

synonyms:

entertainer · performer · trouper · showman · artist · player · musician · singer · dancer · actor · actress · thespian · comic · comedian · comedienne · clown · impressionist · mime artist · conjuror · magician · acrobat · star · superstar · executant

ORIGIN late 17th century: from the name Thespis + -ian.

February 7 2019

Word of the Week

ob·fus·cate
[ˈäbfəˌskāt]

VERB
obfuscates (third person present) · obfuscated (past tense) · obfuscated (past participle) · obfuscating (present participle)
render obscure, unclear, or unintelligible.
“the spelling changes will deform some familiar words and obfuscate their etymological origins”
synonyms:
obscure · confuse · make obscure/unclear · blur · muddle · jumble · complicate · garble · muddy · cloud · befog · muddy the waters
antonyms:
clarify
bewilder (someone).
“it is more likely to obfuscate people than enlighten them”
synonyms:
bewilder · mystify · puzzle · perplex · baffle · confound · bemuse · befuddle · nonplus · flummox · wilder · maze · gravel

ORIGIN
late Middle English: from late Latin obfuscat- ‘darkened’, from the verb obfuscare, based on Latin fuscus ‘dark’.

February 1 2019

Word of the Week

ei·do·lon

[īˈdōlən]

NOUN
literary
eidola (plural noun) · eidolons (plural noun)
  1. an idealized person or thing.
  2. a specter or phantom.
    synonyms:
    specter · phantom · wraith · spirit · soul · shadow · presence · vision · apparition · hallucination · bodach · Doppelgänger · duppy · spook · phantasm · shade · revenant · visitant · wight · eidolon · manes · lemures
ORIGIN
early 19th century: from Greek eidōlon, from eidos ‘form’.
January 25 2019

Word of the week

con·stel·late

[ˈkänstəlāt]

VERB
literary
constellates (third person present) · constellated (past tense) · constellated (past participle) · constellating (present participle)
  1. form or cause to form into a cluster or group; gather together.
    “the towns and valleys where people constellate” · “their stories were never constellated”
ORIGIN
mid 17th century: from late Latin constellatus, from con- ‘together’ + stellatus ‘arranged like a star’.
January 9 2019

Word of the week

adult art conceptual dark
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

vex

[veks]

VERB
vexes (third person present) · vexed (past tense) · vexed (past participle) · vexing (present participle)
  1. make (someone) feel annoyed, frustrated, or worried, especially with trivial matters.
    “the memory of the conversation still vexed him”
ORIGIN
late Middle English: from Old French vexer, from Latin vexare ‘shake, disturb’.
January 2 2019

Word of the Week

Perquisite

[ˈpərkwəzət]

NOUN
formal
  1. another term for perk.
    • a thing regarded as a special right or privilege enjoyed as a result of one’s position.
      “the wife of a president has all the perquisites of stardom”
      synonyms:
      benefit · value · reward · merit · good point · strong point · asset · plus · bonus · boon · blessing · virtue · privilege · perk · fringe benefit · additional benefit · added extra · attraction · desirability · beauty · usefulness · helpfulness · convenience · advantageousness · expedience · expediency · profit · profitability · advisability · perquisite
      antonyms:
      disadvantage · drawback · handicap
    • historical
      a thing that has served its primary use and is then given to a subordinate or employee as a customary right.
ORIGIN
late Middle English: from medieval Latin perquisitum ‘acquisition’, from Latin perquirere ‘search diligently for’, from per- ‘thoroughly’ + quaerere ‘seek’.
December 27 2018

Word of the Week

sub·li·mate

[sublimate]

VERB
sublimates (third person present) · sublimated (past tense) · sublimated (past participle) · sublimating (present participle)
  1. (in psychoanalytic theory) divert or modify (an instinctual impulse) into a culturally higher or socially more acceptable activity.
    “libido must be sublimated into productive work activities” · “he sublimates his hurt and anger into humor”
    synonyms:
    channel · control · divert · transfer · redirect · convert · refine · purify · transmute
  2. chemistry
    another term for sublime.
NOUN
chemistry
sublimates (plural noun)
  1. a solid deposit of a substance which has sublimed.
ORIGIN
late Middle English (in the sense ‘raise to a higher status’): from Latin sublimat- ‘raised up’, from the verb sublimare.

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