Tag: Animals

Animal Facts~

These Animal Facts Will Blow Your Mind

We are constantly learning new information about animals. In fact, we still discover hundreds of new species a year! And the more we learn about the animal kingdom, the more we discover facts that truly blow our minds. Here are 10 animal facts that do just that.

Some animals may be immortal

You know how most animals get older as time goes on? Turns out that isn’t true 100 percent of the time. Several species demonstrate what researchers refer to as “negligible senescence,” meaning there is little, if any, evidence they age.

For instance, crocodiles are just as likely to die at 10 years old as they are at 100. Their cells don’t degenerate with age like ours do. Crocodiles never stop growing either, so they require more food as they get older.

Turritopsis dohrnii is perhaps the best-known animal with negligible senescence. This species of jellyfish, often referred to as “the immortal jellyfish,” has the ability to revert back to a prepubescent state after reaching sexual maturity. Basically, this jellyfish can reverse its age, making it biologically immortal. Most of these jellyfish will die due to disease or predators, instead of aging.

Penguins propose with pebbles

Humans aren’t the only species who require material possessions to establish a mate. What humans do with rings, penguins do with pebbles. When choosing a mate, a male penguin will present a pebble to her that could be used in a nest for their offspring. When you consider that penguins are already wearing tuxedos, it starts to become clear that we copied a lot of our wedding traditions from them. The phrase “penguins propose with pebbles” also alliterates quite nicely.

Planarian flatworm will regrow itself indefinitely

If you cut a planarian flatworm into two pieces, each piece will regenerate into a full individual. Cut it into three pieces and you’ll get three new individuals. Anytime part of the individual is separated, the remaining piece will grow back the part it’s missing.

This does mean that one planarian flatworm could be used as a completely sustainable source of food. Just eat half and wait for the other half to re-grow. Then we’d have to eat worms though, and who wants that?

Only six to seven percent of shark attack victims are female

Studies out of Australia showed that even though men and women both like to swim in the ocean, sharks seem to go after males far more than females. One study showed that out of a 100 shark attack victims, on average only six to seven of them will be female.

No hard science can show why this is, and the sharks themselves aren’t talking. Some speculate that the reason men are more likely to be attacked by a shark is similar to why more men get in car accidents: a propensity for reckless behavior.

While men and women both like to swim in the ocean, guys are far more likely to be engaging in dumb behavior while in there. This can include swimming or surfing in more dangerous locations, long distance swimming and engaging in riskier water sports that could make them prone to shark attacks.

Ants have built-in GPS

An ant understands its surroundings far better than we do, and possibly even better than our iPhones. A recent study showed that ants understand which direction they are heading, even when they are traveling backward. Scientists believe that ants use tiny magnet-like sensors in their antennae in order to determine where they are in relation to where they want to go via the Earth’s natural magnetic field. So, even if you were to spin an ant around repeatedly in a circle (don’t do that), the ant would still know exactly where it is in relation to where it wants to go.

Chimpanzees go to war

Chimpanzees are our closest living relative on the planet. As such, they share many of our good, and not-so-good, characteristics. These animals, just like us, can be pretty violent. Also, like us, they occasionally go to war.

From 1974 to 1978, Jane Goodall documented “the Gombe Chimpanzee War” between two rival communities of chimpanzees. The community began to separate into two sub-groups in the early 70s. Eventually, they became divided into northern and southern locations of habitat they previously shared together. The southern group was smaller. Over the course of four years, the northern group succeeded in taking over their territory, killing all the males in the community.

The “pizzly bear” now exists

What is a “pizzly bear,” you ask? It is a hybrid polar-grizzly bear that we may be seeing more of in the future. As global sea ice continues to disappear, polar bears are having to travel farther and farther to mate. As such they are ending up in grizzly bear habitat and mating with them.

Last summer in Nunavut, Canada, hunters discovered a pizzly, leading to speculation that more are out there. It is thought that polar bears may eventually go extinct as they begin to mix their DNA with other bear species.

Orangutans were believed to be human

We share 97 percent of our genes with orangutans, which may help to explain why they used to be thought of as rather hairy human beings. Indigenous people of Malaysia and Indonesia used to believe that orangutans were just human beings who preferred to hang out in the forest as opposed to, you know, having to work and stuff. The name “orangutan” is derived from “orang hutan” which literally translates to “person of the forest.”

Sea otters hold hands while they sleep

Sea otters will naturally float, but when sleeping they are at risk of just drifting away. Luckily, these adorable little creatures have developed an easy system to prevent that from happening: they hold hands. Groups of sea otters will all hold hands while eating, sleeping or resting so they all stay together wherever they may drift. A group of otters holding hands is referred to as a “raft.”

Dogs have unique nose prints

If your dog commits a crime, they better make sure to wipe off their nose prints from the scene, otherwise they will be caught for sure. That is because a dog’s nose print is much like our fingerprints, no two sets are identical. A similar phenomenon involves tigers, with no two tigers sharing the exact same set of stripes.

Aren’t animals awesome? We sure think so. Let us know your favorite animal facts in the comments.

— Ian Careyhttps://www.thealternativedaily.com/animal-facts-that-will-blow-your-mind/

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Extraordinary!

https://hubpages.com/animals/25-Most-Amazing-and-Unique-Animals-On-Earth

Walking Leaf (or Leaf Insect)

Also from the family Phyliidae, the walking leaf, or leaf insect, is native to South Asia and Australia. Its amazing natural camouflage makes it virtually invisible in wooded areas, which not only protects them from predators but also lets their prey come to them.

Similarly to mantises and stick bugs, the leaf insect has a tendency to sway back and forth to mimic a real leaf blowing in the wind. Some sources state that these insects may have been in existence 47 million years ago.


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Poisonous Plants

Autumn Crocus

There are two Crocus plants: one that blooms in the spring (Crocus species) and the other in the autumn Colchicum autumnale). The spring plants are more common and are part of the Iridaceae family. These ingestions can cause general gastrointestinal upset including vomiting and diarrhea. These should not be mistaken for Autumn Crocus, part of the Liliaceae family, which contain colchicine. The Autumn Crocus is highly toxic and can cause severe vomiting, gastrointestinal bleeding, liver and kidney damage, and respiratory failure. If you’re not sure what plant it is, bring your pet to their veterinarian immediately for care. Signs may be seen immediately but can be delayed for days.

Azalea

In the same family as rhododendrons, azaleas can have serious effects on pets. Eating even a few leaves can result in vomiting, diarrhea and excessive drooling; without immediate veterinary attention, the pet could fall into a coma and possibly die.

Cyclamen

The roots of this seasonal flowering plant are especially dangerous to pets. If ingested, cyclamen can cause severe vomiting and even death.

Kalanchoe

This popular flowering succulent plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea and heart arrhythmias if ingested by pets.

Lilies

There are dangerous and benign lilies out there, and it’s important to know the difference. Peace, Peruvian, and Calla lilies contain oxalate crystals that cause minor signs, such as tissue irritation to the mouth, tongue, pharynx, and esophagus – this results in minor drooling. The more dangerous, potentially fatal lilies are true lilies, and these include Tiger, Day, Asiatic, Easter and Japanese Show lilies – all of which are highly toxic to cats! Even small ingestions (such as 2-3 petals or leaves) can result in severe kidney failure. If your cat is seen consuming any part of a lily, bring your cat (and the plant) immediately to a veterinarian for medical care. The sooner you bring in your cat, the better and more efficiently we can treat the poisoning.

For more information on lilies, please visit our No Lilies for Kitties campaign.

Oleander

Oleander is an outdoor shrub, popular for its evergreen qualities and delicate flowers. However, the leaves and flowers are extremely toxic if ingested and can cause severe vomiting, slow the heart rate and possibly even cause death.

Dieffenbachia

Popular in many homes and offices, dieffenbachia can cause intense oral irritation, drooling, nausea, vomiting and difficulty swallowing if ingested.

Daffodils

These flowers contain lycorine, an alkaloid with strong emetic properties (something that triggers vomiting). Ingestion of the bulb, plant or flower can cause severe vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and even possible cardiac arrhythmias or respiratory depression. Crystals are found in the outer layer of the bulbs, similar to hyacinths, which cause severe tissue irritation and secondary drooling. Daffodil ingestions can result in more severe symptoms so if an exposure is witnessed or symptoms are seen, we recommend seeking veterinary care for further supportive care.

Lily of the Valley

The Convallaria majalis plant contains cardiac glycosides which will cause symptoms similar to digitalis (foxglove) ingestion. These symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, a drop in heart rate, severe cardiac arrhythmias, and possibly seizures. Pets with any known exposure to this plant should be examined and evaluated by a veterinarian and treated symptomatically.

Sago Palm

Very popular in warmer climates, this household and outdoor plant can be very harmful to pets. If ingested, the leaves and seeds can cause vomiting, bloody stools, damage to the stomach lining, severe liver failure and, in some cases, death.

Tulips and Hyacinths

Tulips contain allergenic lactones while hyacinths contain similar alkaloids. The toxic principle of these plants is very concentrated in the bulbs (versus the leaf or flower), so make sure your dog isn’t digging up the bulbs in the garden. When the plant parts or bulbs are chewed or ingested, it can result in tissue irritation to the mouth and esophagus. Typical signs include profuse drooling, vomiting, or even diarrhea, depending on the amount consumed. There’s no specific antidote, but with supportive care from the veterinarian, animals do quite well. With large ingestions of the bulb, more severe symptoms such as an increase in heart rate and changes in respiration can be seen, and should be treated by a veterinarian. These more severe signs are seen in cattle or our overzealous, chowhound Labradors.

This is only a partial list of poisonous plants.  For a more complete list of plants poisonous to cats and dogs, visit our Poison List.

If you suspect your pet has ingested any of these items or any other questionable substance, call Pet Poison Helpline at 855-764-7661 or your veterinarian for assistance. Accurate and timely identification of the suspected substance is very important. Having the container, package, or label in hand will save valuable time and may save the life of your pet.

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DID YOU KNOW?/Animals we are losing and will be gone forever!/Information Share

These Animals Are About to Disappear From the Planet Forever

Earth is currently experiencing the worst wave of species die-offs — a mass extinction of plants and animals — since the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, according to the Center for Biological Diversity. Scientists say that nearly all of the thousands of currently threatened species — mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, plants and invertebrates — are at risk because of human activities, including habitat loss, introduction of non-natives, and the effects of climate change.

 

Pere David’s Deer

Elaphurus davidianus
Status: Extinct in the Wild
Population: about 600
This semi-aquatic deer of China vanished around 1939 when the last wild one was shot and killed. The Pere David’s Deer has been recovered from the edge of extinction after being reintroduced into captivity in China, according to the IUCN red list. There are now four wild populations being established by escapees from a Nature Reserve during severe flooding in 1998, according to IUCN.

Slide 2 of 33:  Pere David's Deer    Elaphurus davidianus  Status: Extinct in the Wild Population: about 600 This semi-aquatic deer of China vanished around 1939 when the last wild one was shot and killed. The Pere David's Deer has been recovered from the edge of extinction after being reintroduced into captivity in China, according to the IUCN redlist. There are now four wild populations being established by escapees from a Nature Reserve during severe flooding in 1998, according to IUCN.  Photo: Tim Felce (Airwolfhound)/Wikipedia
Scimitar-horned Oryx
Oryx dammah
Status: Extinct in the Wild
The myth of the one-horned unicorn may have originated from this antelope, which was once widespread across northern Africa and was domesticated in ancient Egypt. Overhunting and habitat loss, including competition with domestic livestock, are the main reasons for the extinction of the wild population, according to the IUCN Red list.

Slide 3 of 33:  Scimitar-horned Oryx   Oryx dammah  Status: Extinct in the Wild The myth of the one-horned unicorn may have originated from this antelope, which was once widespread across northern Africa and was domesticated in ancient Egypt. Overhunting and habitat loss, including competition with domestic livestock, are the main reasons for the extinction of the wild population, according to the IUCN Redlist.  Photo: Charles Miller from Basingstoke, United Kingdom, Wikipedia
Guam kingfisher
Todiramphus cinnamominus
Population: about 146
Status: Extinct in the Wild
The Guam kingfisher is a species of kingfisher from the U.S. territory. The wild population was killed off by the non-native brown tree snake. It exists only in captivity. The male pictured here is at the Bronx Zoo.Slide 4 of 33:  Guam kingfisher   Todiramphus cinnamominus  Population: about 146 Status: Extinct in the Wild The Guam kingfisher is a species of kingfisher from the U.S. territory. The wild population was killed off by the non-native brown tree snake. It exists only in captivity. The male pictured here is at the Bronx Zoo.  Photo: Eric Savage/Wikipedia Alagoas Curassow
Mitu mitu
Population: about 130
Status: Extinct in the Wild
Clearance of the lowland forests of Brazil for sugarcane, as well as poaching, have brought this glossy-black, pheasant-like bird to the edge of extinction. While the bird exists in captive breeding programs, much of its wild habitat has been destroyed.
Slide 5 of 33:  Alagoas Curassow   Mitu mitu  Population: about 130 Status: Extinct in the Wild Clearance of the lowland forests of Brazil for sugarcane, as well as poaching, have brought this glossy-black, pheasant-like bird to the edge of extinction. While the bird exists in captive breeding programs, much of its wild habitat has been destroyed.  Photo: Shutterstock
Guam Rail
Hypotaenidia owstoni
Population: about 150
Status: Extinct in the Wild
The last individual in the wild of this flightless but fast-running bird died in 1987, killed by the brown tree snake. Captive breeding programs in Guam and the U.S. may restore the population. Pictured is a Guam Rail at the Cincinnati Zoo.
Slide 6 of 33:  Guam Rail   Hypotaenidia owstoni  Population: about 150 Status: Extinct in the Wild The last individual in the wild of this flightless but fast-running bird died in 1987, killed by the brown tree snake. Captive breeding programs in Guam and the U.S. may restore the population. Pictured is a Guam Rail at the Cincinnati Zoo.  Photo: Greg Hume/Wikipedia South China Tiger
Panthera tigris amoyensis
Status: Critically Endangered (possibly Extinct in the Wild)
Population: 30-80
According to the World Wildlife Fund, the South China tiger population was about 4,000 in the early 1950s. In the next few decades, thousands were killed, hunted as a pest. Though the Chinese government banned hunting in 1979, by 1996 the population was estimated to be just 30-80 of these tigers. Today the big cat is considered to be “functionally extinct,” as it has not been seen in the wild for more than 25 years.Slide 7 of 33:  South China Tiger   Panthera tigris amoyensis  Status: Critically Endangered (possibly Extinct in the Wild) Population: 30-80 According to the World Wildlife Fund, the South China tiger population was about 4,000 in the early 1950s. In the next few decades, thousands were killed, hunted as a pest. Though the Chinese government banned hunting in 1979, by 1996 the population was estimated to be just 30-80 of these tigers. Today the big cat is considered to be "functionally extinct," as it has not been seen in the wild for more than 25 years.  Photo: J. Patrick Fischer/ Wikipedia
Amur Leopard
Panthera pardus orientalis
Status: Critically Endangered
Population: More than 84
A rare subspecies of leopard of the Russian Far East, the Amur leopard can run at speeds of up to 37 mph. It is frequently killed by poachers for its beautiful, spotted fur, according to WWF.Slide 8 of 33:  Amur Leopard   Panthera pardus orientalis  Status: Critically Endangered Population: More than 84 A rare subspecies of leopard of the Russian Far East, the Amur leopard can run at speeds of up to 37 mph. It is frequently killed by poachers for its beautiful, spotted fur, according to WWF.  Photo: Shutterstock
Black Rhino
Diceros bicornis
Status: Critically Endangered
Population: 5,000 – 5,400
Killed in large numbers by European hunters and settlers, today rhinos are an important source of income from ecotourism in places like Namibia. World Wildlife Fund says this species has made a strong comeback from the brink of extinction, but poaching and black-market trafficking of rhino horn continues to threaten recovery. Pictured is a black rhinoceros in Kruger national park, South Africa.Slide 9 of 33:  Black Rhino   Diceros bicornis  Status: Critically Endangered Population: 5,000 - 5,400 Killed in large numbers by European hunters and settlers, today rhinos are an important source of income from ecotourism in places like Namibia. World Wildlife Fund says this species has made a strong comeback from the brink of extinction, but poaching and black-market trafficking of rhino horn continues to threaten recovery. Pictured is a black rhinoceros in Kruger national park, South Africa.  Photo: Shutterstock

 

Orangutan

Pongo pygmaeus

Status: Critically Endangered

Population: About 104,700

 

Sumatran Orangutan

Pongo abelii

Status: Critically Endangered

Population: 14,613

Highly intelligent, Orangutans share 96.4% of genes with humans. Female Orangutans are hunted most, and if caught with offspring, the young are often kept as pets.

Sumatran Orangutans live in the trees of tropical rainforests, and rarely travel on the ground.Slide 10 of 33:  Orangutan   Pongo pygmaeus  Status: Critically Endangered Population: About 104,700  Sumatran Orangutan   Pongo abelii  Status: Critically Endangered Population: 14,613 Highly intelligent, Orangutans share 96.4% of genes with humans. Female Orangutans are hunted most, and if caught with offspring, the young are often kept as pets. Sumatran Orangutans live in the trees of tropical rainforests, and rarely travel on the ground.  Photo: Shutterstock Cross River Gorilla
Gorilla gorilla diehli
Status: Critically Endangered
Population: 200 to 300 individuals
Cross River gorillas live in a region populated by many humans in Cameroon and Nigeria. As humans clear forests for timber, agriculture and livestock, the gorillas continue to lose habitat. They are also poached by hunters.

Slide 11 of 33:  Cross River Gorilla   Gorilla gorilla diehli  Status: Critically Endangered Population: 200 to 300 individuals Cross River gorillas live in a region populated by many humans in Cameroon and Nigeria. As humans clear forests for timber, agriculture and livestock, the gorillas continue to lose habitat. They are also poached by hunters.  Photo: Shutterstock

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/these-animals-are-about-to-disappear-from-the-planet-forever/ss-BBN6P2k?ocid=spartandhp#image=11

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