DID YOU KNOW?/Animals we are losing and will be gone forever!/Information Share

These Animals Are About to Disappear From the Planet Forever

Earth is currently experiencing the worst wave of species die-offs — a mass extinction of plants and animals — since the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, according to the Center for Biological Diversity. Scientists say that nearly all of the thousands of currently threatened species — mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, plants and invertebrates — are at risk because of human activities, including habitat loss, introduction of non-natives, and the effects of climate change.

 

Pere David’s Deer

Elaphurus davidianus
Status: Extinct in the Wild
Population: about 600
This semi-aquatic deer of China vanished around 1939 when the last wild one was shot and killed. The Pere David’s Deer has been recovered from the edge of extinction after being reintroduced into captivity in China, according to the IUCN red list. There are now four wild populations being established by escapees from a Nature Reserve during severe flooding in 1998, according to IUCN.

Slide 2 of 33:  Pere David's Deer    Elaphurus davidianus  Status: Extinct in the Wild Population: about 600 This semi-aquatic deer of China vanished around 1939 when the last wild one was shot and killed. The Pere David's Deer has been recovered from the edge of extinction after being reintroduced into captivity in China, according to the IUCN redlist. There are now four wild populations being established by escapees from a Nature Reserve during severe flooding in 1998, according to IUCN.  Photo: Tim Felce (Airwolfhound)/Wikipedia
Scimitar-horned Oryx
Oryx dammah
Status: Extinct in the Wild
The myth of the one-horned unicorn may have originated from this antelope, which was once widespread across northern Africa and was domesticated in ancient Egypt. Overhunting and habitat loss, including competition with domestic livestock, are the main reasons for the extinction of the wild population, according to the IUCN Red list.

Slide 3 of 33:  Scimitar-horned Oryx   Oryx dammah  Status: Extinct in the Wild The myth of the one-horned unicorn may have originated from this antelope, which was once widespread across northern Africa and was domesticated in ancient Egypt. Overhunting and habitat loss, including competition with domestic livestock, are the main reasons for the extinction of the wild population, according to the IUCN Redlist.  Photo: Charles Miller from Basingstoke, United Kingdom, Wikipedia
Guam kingfisher
Todiramphus cinnamominus
Population: about 146
Status: Extinct in the Wild
The Guam kingfisher is a species of kingfisher from the U.S. territory. The wild population was killed off by the non-native brown tree snake. It exists only in captivity. The male pictured here is at the Bronx Zoo.Slide 4 of 33:  Guam kingfisher   Todiramphus cinnamominus  Population: about 146 Status: Extinct in the Wild The Guam kingfisher is a species of kingfisher from the U.S. territory. The wild population was killed off by the non-native brown tree snake. It exists only in captivity. The male pictured here is at the Bronx Zoo.  Photo: Eric Savage/Wikipedia Alagoas Curassow
Mitu mitu
Population: about 130
Status: Extinct in the Wild
Clearance of the lowland forests of Brazil for sugarcane, as well as poaching, have brought this glossy-black, pheasant-like bird to the edge of extinction. While the bird exists in captive breeding programs, much of its wild habitat has been destroyed.
Slide 5 of 33:  Alagoas Curassow   Mitu mitu  Population: about 130 Status: Extinct in the Wild Clearance of the lowland forests of Brazil for sugarcane, as well as poaching, have brought this glossy-black, pheasant-like bird to the edge of extinction. While the bird exists in captive breeding programs, much of its wild habitat has been destroyed.  Photo: Shutterstock
Guam Rail
Hypotaenidia owstoni
Population: about 150
Status: Extinct in the Wild
The last individual in the wild of this flightless but fast-running bird died in 1987, killed by the brown tree snake. Captive breeding programs in Guam and the U.S. may restore the population. Pictured is a Guam Rail at the Cincinnati Zoo.
Slide 6 of 33:  Guam Rail   Hypotaenidia owstoni  Population: about 150 Status: Extinct in the Wild The last individual in the wild of this flightless but fast-running bird died in 1987, killed by the brown tree snake. Captive breeding programs in Guam and the U.S. may restore the population. Pictured is a Guam Rail at the Cincinnati Zoo.  Photo: Greg Hume/Wikipedia South China Tiger
Panthera tigris amoyensis
Status: Critically Endangered (possibly Extinct in the Wild)
Population: 30-80
According to the World Wildlife Fund, the South China tiger population was about 4,000 in the early 1950s. In the next few decades, thousands were killed, hunted as a pest. Though the Chinese government banned hunting in 1979, by 1996 the population was estimated to be just 30-80 of these tigers. Today the big cat is considered to be “functionally extinct,” as it has not been seen in the wild for more than 25 years.Slide 7 of 33:  South China Tiger   Panthera tigris amoyensis  Status: Critically Endangered (possibly Extinct in the Wild) Population: 30-80 According to the World Wildlife Fund, the South China tiger population was about 4,000 in the early 1950s. In the next few decades, thousands were killed, hunted as a pest. Though the Chinese government banned hunting in 1979, by 1996 the population was estimated to be just 30-80 of these tigers. Today the big cat is considered to be "functionally extinct," as it has not been seen in the wild for more than 25 years.  Photo: J. Patrick Fischer/ Wikipedia
Amur Leopard
Panthera pardus orientalis
Status: Critically Endangered
Population: More than 84
A rare subspecies of leopard of the Russian Far East, the Amur leopard can run at speeds of up to 37 mph. It is frequently killed by poachers for its beautiful, spotted fur, according to WWF.Slide 8 of 33:  Amur Leopard   Panthera pardus orientalis  Status: Critically Endangered Population: More than 84 A rare subspecies of leopard of the Russian Far East, the Amur leopard can run at speeds of up to 37 mph. It is frequently killed by poachers for its beautiful, spotted fur, according to WWF.  Photo: Shutterstock
Black Rhino
Diceros bicornis
Status: Critically Endangered
Population: 5,000 – 5,400
Killed in large numbers by European hunters and settlers, today rhinos are an important source of income from ecotourism in places like Namibia. World Wildlife Fund says this species has made a strong comeback from the brink of extinction, but poaching and black-market trafficking of rhino horn continues to threaten recovery. Pictured is a black rhinoceros in Kruger national park, South Africa.Slide 9 of 33:  Black Rhino   Diceros bicornis  Status: Critically Endangered Population: 5,000 - 5,400 Killed in large numbers by European hunters and settlers, today rhinos are an important source of income from ecotourism in places like Namibia. World Wildlife Fund says this species has made a strong comeback from the brink of extinction, but poaching and black-market trafficking of rhino horn continues to threaten recovery. Pictured is a black rhinoceros in Kruger national park, South Africa.  Photo: Shutterstock

 

Orangutan

Pongo pygmaeus

Status: Critically Endangered

Population: About 104,700

 

Sumatran Orangutan

Pongo abelii

Status: Critically Endangered

Population: 14,613

Highly intelligent, Orangutans share 96.4% of genes with humans. Female Orangutans are hunted most, and if caught with offspring, the young are often kept as pets.

Sumatran Orangutans live in the trees of tropical rainforests, and rarely travel on the ground.Slide 10 of 33:  Orangutan   Pongo pygmaeus  Status: Critically Endangered Population: About 104,700  Sumatran Orangutan   Pongo abelii  Status: Critically Endangered Population: 14,613 Highly intelligent, Orangutans share 96.4% of genes with humans. Female Orangutans are hunted most, and if caught with offspring, the young are often kept as pets. Sumatran Orangutans live in the trees of tropical rainforests, and rarely travel on the ground.  Photo: Shutterstock Cross River Gorilla
Gorilla gorilla diehli
Status: Critically Endangered
Population: 200 to 300 individuals
Cross River gorillas live in a region populated by many humans in Cameroon and Nigeria. As humans clear forests for timber, agriculture and livestock, the gorillas continue to lose habitat. They are also poached by hunters.

Slide 11 of 33:  Cross River Gorilla   Gorilla gorilla diehli  Status: Critically Endangered Population: 200 to 300 individuals Cross River gorillas live in a region populated by many humans in Cameroon and Nigeria. As humans clear forests for timber, agriculture and livestock, the gorillas continue to lose habitat. They are also poached by hunters.  Photo: Shutterstock

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