Author Archives: Mws R

About Mws R

"If you are going to write, write from the heart." MwsR "Life has not been the easiest, but it could of been worse!" MwsR Life is about doing all you can to help others. Don't go chasing rainbows, "make your own pot of gold." Love, Hope, Faith, the greatest of these is Love!

Laugh a Little( Corona virus humor)

I’m not trying to make light if the thousands who have had coronavirus or have died from this horrible pandemic.My hope is that I can make you smile despite all the sadness.

MwsR❤️

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Strengthen Your Core Yoga Link Share

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Corona virus Fact Continued…

 It won’t diminish in warm temperatures

Slide 4 of 14: Since most associate the regular flu season with the colder months of the year, many assume that COVID-19 will taper off as temperatures rise. But Salas-Whalen emphasizes that it's not as simple as that."Unfortunately, the virology of COVID-19 does not diminish in warm temperatures," she says. "Although the virus may have a seasonal cycle, it is not reasonable to expect a huge decline in transmission due to warmer weather alone. We see the largest decrease in infections when people refrain from being in locations with poor ventilation and/or large crowds."

Since most associate the regular flu season with the colder months of the year, many assume that COVID-19 will taper off as temperatures rise. But Salas-Whalen emphasizes that it’s not as simple as that.

“Unfortunately, the virology of COVID-19 does not diminish in warm temperatures,” she says. “Although the virus may have a seasonal cycle, it is not reasonable to expect a huge decline in transmission due to warmer weather alone. We see the largest decrease in infections when people refrain from being in locations with poor ventilation and/or large crowds.”

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Fever Treatment Guide

AgeTemperatureWhat to do
0-3 months100.4 F (38 C) or higher taken rectallyCall the doctor, even if your child doesn’t have any other signs or symptoms.
3-6 monthsUp to 102 F (38.9 C) taken rectallyEncourage your child to rest and drink plenty of fluids. Medication isn’t needed. Call the doctor if your child seems unusually irritable, lethargic or uncomfortable.
3-6 monthsAbove 102 F (38.9 C) taken rectallyCall the doctor; he or she may recommend that you bring your child in for an exam.
6-24 monthsAbove 102 F (38.9 C) taken rectallyGive your child acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). If your child is age 6 months or older, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) is OK, too. Read the label carefully for proper dosage. Don’t give aspirin to an infant or toddler. Call the doctor if the fever doesn’t respond to the medication or lasts longer than one day.
AgeTemperatureWhat to do
2-17 yearsUp to 102 F (38.9 C) taken rectally for children age 3 and younger, or taken orally for children older than 3Encourage your child to rest and drink plenty of fluids. Medication isn’t needed. Call the doctor if your child seems unusually irritable or lethargic or complains of significant discomfort.
2-17 yearsAbove 102 F (38.9 C) taken rectally for children age 3 and younger, or taken orally for children older than 3If your child seems uncomfortable, give your child acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others). Read the label carefully for proper dosage, and be careful not to give your child more than one medication containing acetaminophens, such as some cough and cold medicines. Avoid giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Call the doctor if the fever doesn’t respond to the medication or lasts longer than three days.
AgeTemperatureWhat to do
18 years and upUp to 102 F (38.9 C) taken orallyRest and drink plenty of fluids. Medication isn’t needed. Call the doctor if the fever is accompanied by a severe headache, stiff neck, shortness of breath, or other unusual signs or symptoms.
18 years and upAbove 102 F (38.9 C) taken orallyIf you’re uncomfortable, take acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or aspirin. Read the label carefully for proper dosage, and be careful not to take more than one medication containing acetaminophens, such as some cough and cold medicines. Call the doctor if the fever doesn’t respond to the medication, is consistently 103 F (39.4 C) or higher, or lasts longer than three days.

March 06, 2018

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What Is Too High?

Fever

Overview

A fever is a temporary increase in your body temperature, often due to an illness. Having a fever is a sign that something out of the ordinary is going on in your body.

For an adult, a fever may be uncomfortable, but usually isn’t a cause for concern unless it reaches 103 F (39.4 C) or higher. For infants and toddlers, a slightly elevated temperature may indicate a serious infection.

Fevers generally go away within a few days. A number of over-the-counter medications lower a fever, but sometimes it’s better left untreated. Fever seems to play a key role in helping your body fight off a number of infections.

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Symptoms

You have a fever when your temperature rises above its normal range. What’s normal for you may be a little higher or lower than the average normal temperature of 98.6 F (37 C).

Depending on what’s causing your fever, additional fever signs and symptoms may include:

  • Sweating
  • Chills and shivering
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches
  • Loss of appetite
  • Irritability
  • Dehydration
  • General weakness

Children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years might experience febrile seizures. About a third of the children who have one febrile seizure will have another one, most commonly within the next 12 months.

Taking a temperature

To check your or your child’s temperature, you can choose from several types of thermometers, including oral, rectal, ear (tympanic) and forehead (temporal artery) thermometers.

Although it’s not the most accurate way to take a temperature, you can use an oral thermometer for an armpit (axillary) reading:

  1. Place the thermometer in the armpit and cross your arms or your child’s arms over the chest.
  2. Wait four to five minutes. The axillary temperature is slightly lower than an oral temperature.
  3. If you call your doctor, report the actual number on the thermometer and where on the body you took the temperature.

Use a rectal thermometer for infants:

  1. Place a dab of petroleum jelly on the bulb.
  2. Lay your baby on his or her tummy.
  3. Carefully insert the bulb 1/2 to 1 inch (1.3 to 2.5 centimeters) into your baby’s rectum.
  4. Hold the bulb and your baby still for three minutes.
  5. Don’t let go of the thermometer while it’s inside your baby. If your baby squirms, the thermometer could go deeper and cause an injury.

When to see a doctor

Fevers by themselves may not be a cause for alarm — or a reason to call a doctor. Yet there are some circumstances when you should seek medical advice for your baby, your child or yourself.

Infants

An unexplained fever is greater cause for concern in infants and in children than in adults. Call your baby’s doctor if your child is:

  • Younger than age 3 months and has a rectal temperature of 100.4 F (38 C) or higher.
  • Between ages 3 and 6 months and has a rectal temperature up to 102 F (38.9 C) and seems unusually irritable, lethargic or uncomfortable or has a temperature higher than 102 F (38.9 C).
  • Between ages 6 and 24 months and has a rectal temperature higher than 102 F (38.9 C) that lasts longer than one day but shows no other symptoms. If your child also has other signs and symptoms, such as a cold, cough or diarrhea, you might call your child’s doctor sooner based on severity.

Children

There’s probably no cause for alarm if your child has a fever but is responsive — making eye contact with you and responding to your facial expressions and to your voice — and is drinking fluids and playing.

Call your child’s doctor if your child:

  • Is listless or irritable, vomits repeatedly, has a severe headache or stomachache, or has any other symptoms causing significant discomfort.
  • Has a fever after being left in a hot car. Seek medical care immediately.
  • Has a fever that lasts longer than three days.
  • Appears listless and has poor eye contact with you.

Ask your child’s doctor for guidance in special circumstances, such as a child with immune system problems or with a pre-existing illness.

Adults

Call your doctor if your temperature is 103 F (39.4 C) or higher. Seek immediate medical attention if any of these signs or symptoms accompanies a fever:

  • Severe headache
  • Unusual skin rash, especially if the rash rapidly worsens
  • Unusual sensitivity to bright light
  • Stiff neck and pain when you bend your head forward
  • Mental confusion
  • Persistent vomiting
  • Difficulty breathing or chest pain
  • Abdominal pain or pain when urinating
  • Convulsions or seizures

Causes

Fever occurs when an area in your brain called the hypothalamus (hi-poe-THAL-uh-muhs) — also known as your body’s “thermostat” — shifts the set point of your normal body temperature upward. When this happens, you may feel chilled and add layers of clothing or wrap up in a blanket, or you may shiver to generate more body heat, eventually resulting in an elevated body temperature.

Normal body temperature varies throughout the day — it’s lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon and evening. Although most people consider 98.6 F (37 C) normal, your body temperature can vary by a degree or more — from about 97 F (36.1 C) to 99 F (37.2 C) — and still be considered normal.

Fever or elevated body temperature might be caused by:

  • A virus
  • A bacterial infection
  • Heat exhaustion
  • Certain inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis — inflammation of the lining of your joints (synovium)
  • A malignant tumor
  • Some medications, such as antibiotics and drugs used to treat high blood pressure or seizures
  • Some immunizations, such as the diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) or pneumococcal vaccine

Sometimes the cause of a fever can’t be identified. If you have a fever for more than three weeks and your doctor isn’t able to find the cause after extensive evaluation, the diagnosis may be fever of unknown origin.

Complications

Children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years may experience fever-induced convulsions (febrile seizures), which usually involve loss of consciousness and shaking of limbs on both sides of the body. Although alarming for parents, the vast majority of febrile seizures cause no lasting effects.

If a seizure occurs:

  • Lay your child on his or her side or stomach on the floor or ground
  • Remove any sharp objects that are near your child
  • Loosen tight clothing
  • Hold your child to prevent injury
  • Don’t place anything in your child’s mouth or try to stop the seizure

Most seizures stop on their own. Take your child to the doctor as soon as possible after the seizure to determine the cause of the fever.

Call for emergency medical assistance if a seizure lasts longer than five minutes.

Prevention

You may be able to prevent fevers by reducing exposure to infectious diseases. Here are some tips that can help:

  • Wash your hands often and teach your children to do the same, especially before eating, after using the toilet, after spending time in a crowd or around someone who’s sick, after petting animals, and during travel on public transportation.
  • Show your children how to wash their hands thoroughly, covering both the front and back of each hand with soap and rinsing completely under running water.
  • Carry hand sanitizer with you for times when you don’t have access to soap and water.
  • Try to avoid touching your nose, mouth or eyes, as these are the main ways that viruses and bacteria can enter your body and cause infection.
  • Cover your mouth when you cough and your nose when you sneeze, and teach your children to do likewise. Whenever possible, turn away from others when coughing or sneezing to avoid passing germs along to them.
  • Avoid sharing cups, water bottles and utensils with your child or children.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

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