Dead Butt Syndrome? Yes, It Is A Real Thing

What you need to know about “dead butt” syndrome

Due to Covid-19 stay-at-home orders, many people are spending more time at home, whether they’re working remotely or currently unemployed. Unfortunately, more time at home can lead to sedentary behaviors, such as sitting for long periods of time on the couch or your at-home office chair. Sitting can take a toll on the body, affecting everything from the neck to your legs.

“When we sit for long periods of time some very important elements of our core can become compromised,” says Sue Hitzmann, manual therapist and exercise physiologist and creator of the MELT Method and Melt Performance. Once you do finally stand up, the components of your core muscle group—your trunk—and key elements of your hip joints don’t move as smoothly, and your body compensates by putting stress on areas not designed to handle the demand.

Enter: Dead butt syndrome, clinically known as gluteus medius tendinopathy. The condition, caused by inflammation in the tendons in one of the smaller muscles that make up the buttocks, called the gluteus medius, can also occur in runners who don’t cross-train.

This pain can begin with little things like tension or aches in your neck and low back, or you’ll find yourself constantly shifting in your chair to find (in vain) a comfy position. Eventually, the symptoms are more noticeable and frequent. Your hips feel tight and your back will feel stiff. Your joints will snap, crackle, and pop when you move. But the symptoms aren’t just felt on the inside, they’re seen on the outside too, like a swayback posture for starters. (Find out the easy ways you can improve your posture.)

“The easiest and most obvious thing you can do during the workday is to get up more often,” says Hitzmann. If necessary set a timer to remind yourself to get up for a few minutes every hour. Then try these MELT Moves created by Hitzmann; you can do them three times a week for best results.

  • Slide 1 of 7: Due to Covid-19 stay-at-home orders, many people are spending more time at home, whether they're working remotely or currently unemployed. Unfortunately, more time at home can lead to sedentary behaviors, such as sitting for long periods of time on the couch or your at-home office chair. Sitting can take a toll on the body, affecting everything from the neck to your legs. "When we sit for long periods of time some very important elements of our core can become compromised," says Sue Hitzmann, manual therapist and exercise physiologist and creator of the MELT Method and Melt Performance. Once you do finally stand up, the components of your core muscle group—your trunk—and key elements of your hip joints don't move as smoothly, and your body compensates by putting stress on areas not designed to handle the demand. Enter: Dead butt syndrome, clinically known as gluteus medius tendinopathy. The condition, caused by inflammation in the tendons in one of the smaller muscles that make up the buttocks, called the gluteus medius, can also occur in runners who don't cross train. This pain can begin with little things like tension or aches in your neck and low back, or you'll find yourself constantly shifting in your chair to find (in vain) a comfy position. Eventually, the symptoms are more noticeable and frequent. Your hips feel tight and your back will feel stiff. Your joints will snap, crackle, and pop when you move. But the symptoms aren't just felt on the inside, they're seen on the outside too, like a swayback posture for starters. (Find out the easy ways you can improve your posture.) "The easiest and most obvious thing you can do during the workday is to get up more often," says Hitzmann. If necessary set a timer to remind yourself to get up for a few minutes every hour. Then try these MELT Moves created by Hitzmann; you can do them three times a week for best results.
Slide 3 of 7:  If you find a tender spot, what we call a "Barrier", simply roll up to the barrier rather than landing right on the tender spot. Create an indirect shear by clamming the leg open and closed at the hip joint (bring your left knee up toward the right and then let it fall back again). Or try a direct shear by straightening out your left leg and roll your body left to right; the roller stays still and you move your body slightly over the roller. Once you create the shear, roll onto the tender spot and let it compress. Wait on the spot, take two to three focused breaths right into the area you are compressing, and give the tissue a moment to adapt. Repeat on the other side. Here are more foam roller exercises that your body will thank you for doing.
Deep Hip Indirect Shear
If you find a tender spot, what we call a “Barrier”, simply roll up to the barrier rather than landing right on the tender spot. Create an indirect shear by clamming the leg open and closed at the hip joint (bring your left knee up toward the right and then let it fall back again). Or try a direct shear by straightening out your left leg and roll your body left to right; the roller stays still and you move your body slightly over the roller. Once you create the shear, roll onto the tender spot and let it compress. Wait on the spot, take two to three focused breaths right into the area you are compressing, and give the tissue a moment to adapt. Repeat on the other side. Here are more foam roller exercises that your body will thank you for doing.
Slide 2 of 7: First up, the deep hip glide and shear: Sit upright on a MELT Body Roller (or a similar roller you have at home). Place your left hand behind the roller and let your left leg fall to the side; keep your right leg bent with foot flat on the floor. GLIDE: Slowly move your body over the roller to prepare the tissue for the next technique called SHEAR.
Deep hip glide
First up, the deep hip glide and shear: Sit upright on a MELT Body Roller (or a similar roller you have at home). Place your left hand behind the roller and let your left leg fall to the side; keep your right leg bent with foot flat on the floor. GLIDE: Slowly move your body over the roller to prepare the tissue for the next technique called SHEAR.

Mini bridge

This move will help prevent your hamstrings and low back muscles from over-compensating: Place your feet hip width apart, knees bent with your hips on the top of the roller; keep your arms flat on the floor just out from your sides for balance. Push into your feet and try to ease the weight of your hips off the roller. Take care not to arch your back. Instead, think about your knees reaching over your toes. Hold this pose for five to ten seconds then slowly return your hips to the top of the roller. Repeat this slow controlled lift four times. Then repeat the pattern four more times without a pause. 

  • Slide 5 of 7: This move will help prevent your hamstrings and low back muscles from over-compensating: Place your feet hip width apart, knees bent with your hips on the top of the roller; keep your arms flat on the floor just out from your sides for balance. Push into your feet and try to ease the weight of your hips off the roller. Take care not to arch your back. Instead, think about your knees reaching over your toes. Hold this pose for five to ten seconds then slowly return your hips to the top of the roller. Repeat this slow controlled lift four times. Then repeat the pattern four more times without a pause. 
Slide 4 of 7: Lie on your back with the roller under your pelvis so that the majority of your glutes are on the opposite side of the roller from your trunk, and the top of your hips are on your side of the roller—not on the top. Keep your left foot planted firmly on the ground and push your left knee over your toes as you bring your right knee toward your chest; tuck your pelvis downward. This will lengthen the front side of the thigh and spine. Inhale and put a little pressure into the pose; grasp your right knee and gently pull toward your chest as you exhale and repeat the lengthening part by tucking your pelvis. Repeat on the other side.

Bent knee press

Lie on your back with the roller under your pelvis so that the majority of your glutes are on the opposite side of the roller from your trunk, and the top of your hips are on your side of the roller—not on the top. Keep your left foot planted firmly on the ground and push your left knee over your toes as you bring your right knee toward your chest; tuck your pelvis downward. This will lengthen the front side of the thigh and spine. Inhale and put a little pressure into the pose; grasp your right knee and gently pull toward your chest as you exhale and repeat the lengthening part by tucking your pelvis. Repeat on the other side.

Slide 6 of 7: This move reverses the traditional lunge to activate the lower part of your glutes and limit the amount of compensation your quadriceps and upper glutes are doing. (Worried about your glutes? Check out the butt exercises you can do at home.) Stand over the roller, right foot in front, left foot behind. Lower your left leg just below the knee onto the roller with your hips level. Push into your right foot and slowly hover your left shin over the roller—about two to three inches above. Hold this pose for five to ten seconds and slowly return your left shin to the roller and repeat the lift-and-pause four times. Next, repeat the movement four more times without the pause. Repeat on the other side.

The hover and lunge

This move reverses the traditional lunge to activate the lower part of your glutes and limit the amount of compensation your quadriceps and upper glutes are doing. (Worried about your glutes? Check out the butt exercises you can do at home.)

Stand over the roller, right foot in front, left foot behind. Lower your left leg just below the knee onto the roller with your hips level. Push into your right foot and slowly hover your left shin over the roller—about two to three inches above. Hold this pose for five to ten seconds and slowly return your left shin to the roller and repeat the lift-and-pause four times. Next, repeat the movement four more times without the pause. Repeat on the other side.

Slide 7 of 7: Lie on your left side with your knees bent and your head resting on the roller; stretch your arms out in front of you, left arm flat, right arm with hand placed flat on the r for balance. With your left foot on the r and your weight on your upper thigh (rather than your hip), roll your right hip forward so that your right knee is slightly in front of your left. Keep your heels together as you slowly lift your right knee up while keeping your pelvis and torso still; pause. Hold for 30 seconds, then return to the original position. Repeat four times, then switch sides.

Clams
Lie on your left side with your knees bent and your head resting on the roller; stretch your arms out in front of you, left arm flat, right arm with hand placed flat on the r for balance. With your left foot on the r and your weight on your upper thigh (rather than your hip), roll your right hip forward so that your right knee is slightly in front of your left.
Keep your heels together as you slowly lift your right knee up while keeping your pelvis and torso still; pause. Hold for 30 seconds, then return to the original position. Repeat four times, then switch sides.

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Fibromyalgia and Diet

Fibromyalgia is a chronic disease that affects around 4 million adults in the United States (1Trusted Source).

Though research is limited, scientific evidence shows that some diets reduce pain and symptoms related to fibromyalgia.

This article reviews which foods to eat and avoid to help manage fibromyalgia, along with 10 tasty recipes.

Shakshuka egg recipe

Fibromyalgia and diet

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that’s characterized by widespread muscle pain. Due to chronic pain, many people with fibromyalgia also have sleep disorders, chronic fatigue, and depression (1Trusted Source).

The cause of fibromyalgia isn’t yet known, and the condition cannot be cured. People with fibromyalgia must manage their symptoms through medical treatment and lifestyle changes (1Trusted Source).

One way to help symptoms is by following a certain diet.

Though little research has been done, some evidence points to certain dietary approaches that may help manage fibromyalgia symptoms. These include (2Trusted Source):

  • Low-calorie diets. Weight loss may help with fibromyalgia symptoms, so a low-calorie diet may be a good approach.
  • Vegetarian diets. These diets are rich in anti-inflammatory fruits, vegetables, nuts, and legumes. The strongest evidence is for raw vegetarian diets.
  • Low FODMAP diets. FODMAPS are types of carbs that some people can’t digest. Low FODMAP diets exclude most dairy products, grains, fruits, and vegetables. It’s a very restrictive, highly anti-inflammatory way of eating.

A diet high in anti-inflammatory foods may also help manage fibromyalgia symptoms, as chronic inflammation is one of the suspected causes of the disease (3Trusted Source).

Regardless, this disease and its symptoms are highly individualized. Different diets may work better or worse depending on the individual.

You may benefit from working with a registered dietitian if you’re following a more complex eating pattern, such as a raw vegetarian or low FODMAP diet, to manage your fibromyalgia symptoms.

Foods to include

Types of foods that are typically part of dietary approaches for fibromyalgia include (2Trusted Source):

  • Low calorie: low calorie, high protein, high fiber, or filling foods like fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, and whole grains
  • Vegetarian: fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and seeds; some vegetarians may include eggs or dairy products while raw vegetarians eat only uncooked plant foods
  • Low FODMAP: only foods that are low in FODMAPs, including most meats, rice, some fruits and vegetables, and limited dairy products

You should also add a variety of anti-inflammatory foods that fit into your preferred eating pattern, as they may help alleviate symptoms. Examples of anti-inflammatory foods include (4Trusted Source, 5Trusted Source):

  • Protein: salmon, eggs, chickpeas, Greek yogurt
  • Fruits: bananas, oranges, apples, grapes, blueberries, strawberries, blackberries, tomatoes, avocado
  • Vegetables: spinach, kale, zucchini, cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, bell peppers, cucumber, carrots
  • Carbs: sweet potatoes, brown rice, honey
  • Fats: olive oil, coconut oil
  • Herbs and spices: turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, rosemary, garlic, cloves

Note that some of these foods, such as honey and chickpeas, are higher in FODMAPs. As such, avoid them if you’re strictly following a low FODMAP diet.

Foods to avoid

On the other hand, foods that are typically avoided in the dietary approaches to fibromyalgia are (2Trusted Source):

  • Low calorie. Exclude empty calories like chips, cookies, cakes, ice cream, sugary drinks, added sugars, and added fats.
  • Vegetarian. All vegetarians exclude meat from their diet. However, raw vegetarians will also exclude cooked foods.
  • Low FODMAP. On the low FODMAP diet, you need to exclude all foods that are high in FODMAPs. This includes wheat, dairy products, beans, garlic, and onions.
  • Anti-inflammatory. To decrease inflammation you should also avoid pro-inflammatory foods, which include highly processed foods, refined carbs, fast food, and processed vegetable oils like soybean oil or corn oil (6Trusted Source).

SUMMARY

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized by muscle pain. Some dietary approaches may help manage its symptoms, including anti-inflammatory, low calorie, raw vegetarian, or low FODMAP diets.

Fibromyalgia-friendly recipes

The following recipes are appropriate for various dietary approaches to fibromyalgia, and they all contain anti-inflammatory ingredients like fruits, vegetables, herbs, and spices.

1. Shakshuka for one (vegetarian, low FODMAP)

Shakshuka is a North African dish made by simmering eggs in tomato sauce. However, this take includes some healthy, anti-inflammatory additions like spinach and fresh parsley (4Trusted Source).

At only 286 calories per serving, it’s also an ideal meal for anyone following a low calorie diet to help manage their fibromyalgia.

It’s likewise appropriate for anyone following a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, which includes eggs and dairy products.

Simply swap the onions and garlic for garlic- and/or shallot-infused olive oil to make it FODMAP-free.

Get the recipe here.

2. Mango turmeric overnight oats (vegetarian)

This easy breakfast dish is appropriate for raw vegetarian diets, as you don’t have to cook it. Instead, the oats soften overnight by soaking in coconut milk, resulting in a creamy and smooth texture.

Additionally, this recipe contains several anti-inflammatory ingredients like ginger, cinnamon, turmeric, and honey (7Trusted Source, 8Trusted Source).

Get the recipe here.

3. Watermelon, mint, and grilled cheese salad (vegetarian)

This flavorful salad makes a great summer meal. With 484 calories in a generous serving, it can be part of a carefully planned low calorie diet.

It’s also appropriate for lacto-vegetarian diets, which include dairy products.

Finally, the salad is rich in vitamin C — a potent anti-inflammatory antioxidant — from the watermelon (9Trusted Source).

Get the recipe here.

4. Wild blueberry cauliflower smoothie (vegetarian)

Smoothies are a perfect on-the-go meal solution, and this vegan smoothie is compatible with a raw vegetarian diet for fibromyalgia. Because it contains only 340 calories per serving, it’s also an appropriate meal for low calorie diets.

It contains blueberries, strawberries, and purple cauliflower, which are all rich sources of anthocyanins — antioxidant pigments that give these fruits and vegetables their bright colors (10Trusted Source).

Anthocyanins are also highly anti-inflammatory, with one study showing they improved sleep quality in people with fibromyalgia. However, more research is needed (10Trusted Source).

Get the recipe here.

5. Mediterranean vegetable salad with prunes and fruit dressing (vegetarian)

This vegan salad recipe is loaded with anti-inflammatory ingredients like prunes and beets (10Trusted Source).

With a few simple tweaks, like opting to not cook down the prune juice and swapping out the edamame for nuts like walnuts or pecans, you can make this a raw vegan recipe.

Additionally, this entrée salad contains only 450 calories in a large portion — making it a good fit for a low calorie diet.

Get the recipe here.

6. Fresh spring rolls (vegetarian, low FODMAP)

These low FODMAP spring rolls are loaded with vegetables and are naturally low in calories — containing only 240 calories in a 3-roll serving.

They’re also full of a variety of antioxidants from colorful vegetables like carrots, zucchini, bell pepper, and red cabbage (11Trusted Source).

For an extra dose of protein, you can add tofu or cooked shrimp.

Get the recipe here.

7. Chocolate mint quinoa breakfast bowl (vegetarian, low FODMAP)

This indulgent breakfast recipe is loaded with antioxidants from anti-inflammatory berries, dark chocolate, and pumpkin seeds (11Trusted Source, 12Trusted Source).

At 490 calories per serving, it’s a bit high in calories for breakfast on a low calorie diet. However, you could easily include a smaller portion of this breakfast bowl or split it into two meals.

It’s also vegetarian and low in FODMAPs, making it ideal for people with fibromyalgia.

Get the recipe here.

8. Trail mix (vegetarian, low FODMAP)

This quick and easy trail mix recipe is a perfect vegetarian and low FODMAP grab-and-go snack. It can fit into a low calorie diet as well, as it only contains 140 calories per serving.

It contains antioxidant-rich pecans, pumpkin seeds, bananas, and dark chocolate — which may help decrease chronic inflammation (11Trusted Source, 12Trusted Source).

Get the recipe here.

9. Sprouted rice salad (vegetarian, low FODMAP)

This salad can be eaten warm or cold, so it’s a great vegetarian and low FODMAP dinner or lunch option. It also contains only 280 calories per serving, making it a good choice for low calorie diets as well.

It’s rich in anti-inflammatory antioxidants from pomegranate, including vitamin C (9Trusted Source, 11Trusted Source).

Get the recipe here.

10. Low carb chicken salad on zucchini chips (low FODMAP)

This low FODMAP chicken salad can easily be made vegetarian by replacing the chicken with hard-boiled eggs or cubed tofu.

It’s full of anti-inflammatory ingredients, like grapes, pecans, purple cabbage, and rosemary (7Trusted Source).

At only 265 calories per serving, it can also be eaten on a low calorie diet.

Get the recipe here.

SUMMARY

These 10 recipes are appropriate for diets to manage fibromyalgia symptoms. Most are vegetarian, and they all contain anti-inflammatory foods. Some are low in calories and FODMAPs.

The bottom line

Fibromyalgia is an incurable disease characterized by chronic muscle pain. According to some research, certain diets may help manage the symptoms.

Although further studies are needed, the diets with the most evidence include low calorie diets, vegetarian diets, and low FODMAP diets that are rich in anti-inflammatory foods.

If you’re having trouble planning a diet to help with your fibromyalgia, you should consult a registered dietitian for help.

Although fibromyalgia doesn’t have a cure, eating an anti-inflammatory diet may have powerful effects on your symptoms and quality of life.HEALTHLINE NEWSLETTERGet our weekly Fibromyalgia email

To help you manage pain and avoid fatigue, we’ll send you tips, techniques, and trustworthy info on meds.Enter your emailSIGN UP NOW

Written by SaVanna Shoemaker, MS, RDN, LD on April 28, 2020

Thank you for reading 🙂

Hair Loss, Due To Stress

a close up of a logo

Why does stress cause hair loss?
“There’s a condition called Telogen Effluvium, where large numbers of hairs are lost after a stressful experience,” explains Annie Chiu, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist in California. Normally, Dr. Chiu explains, hairs only shed when they enter a stage called Telogen, and most hairs are in a constant growing phrase, called Anagen. But when you experience stress or shock, Telogen Effluvium, it “pushes growing anagen hairs into telogen, so you will see a ton of hair loss in a short time,” she says.

How quickly can stress affect hair loss?
Eva Proudman, a clinical trichologist in London, says that significant hair loss can be observed a few months after a stressful period. However, the exact ways in which stress manifests itself are complex and will vary based on the person, says Sophia Kogan, M.D., the co-founder and chief medical advisor of Nutrafol. “Someone who has chronic high stress may notice the effects of a stressful event more immediately, compared to others who may need a major stressor or long-term stress to have a meaningful effect on their hair growth,” Dr. Kogan says.


How common is stress-induced hair loss?
According to the Cleveland Clinic, 50 percent of women will experience noticeable hair loss in their life. Of those, most of them will experience female-pattern hair loss (FPHL), as this affects roughly 30 million women in the U.S. This is different than stress-induced hair loss, but the Cleveland Clinic confirms that stress is a popular cause of female hair loss.

Can you recover from stress-induced hair loss?
This type of hair loss is temporary and almost always resolves in full recovery. However, it may take longer for someone prone to chronic stress to recover than others since their stress isn’t episodic. Ultimately, Dr. Kogan says that shedding stops when stress stops.

How can you stop or slow down stress-induced hair loss?
The first step seems obvious: relieve yourself from stress. But of course, that’s easier said than done. Dr. Chiu recommends yoga, meditation, lavender aromatherapy, drinking chamomile tea before bedtime, and practicing self-care to help to slow down your stress brain waves. Dr. Kogan agrees, saying that combining lifestyle changes with nutritional shifts can be helpful in reducing stress both inside and out. She suggests taking ashwagandha, a botanical that has been clinically shown to help balance stress hormones and build resilience in chronically stressed adults. Additionally, Dr. Kogan suggests avoiding strict diets or cleanses during a particularly stressful time since they could be additional stressors on the body.

What supplements can help stop hair loss and help hair grow back?
Dr. Chiu advises getting the necessary vitamins and nutrients from your diet first, then considering supplements such as biotin. According to one study, 38 percent of women complaining of hair loss have a biotin deficiency, and since biotin helps convert some nutrients into energy, it can help with both hair and nail growth. “I always recommend 500mcg of oral biotin per day to push through the hair loss cycle faster,” Dr. Chiu says. Additionally, she recommends supplements like Nutrafol and Foligain to address overall hair loss. Nutrafol, as Dr. Kogan notes, contains the stress adaptogen, ashwagandha.

Are there any topical products that can prevent further hair loss and stimulate hair growth?
Yes! Look for products with minoxidil, an FDA-approved active ingredient that’s proven to promote hair regrowth with continued use. According to the Mayo Clinic, side effects may include itchiness and skin irritation, so always do a patch test and wait 24 hours to see how your skin responds to it.

Thank you for reading 🙂

Blood Clot Help, Read This!

Home remedies for blood clot : Find out the blood clot causes, symptoms, signs, cure and tips. Use these home remedies for blood and treat it naturally.

By Sarika Rana
Updated: August 31, 2018 17:22 IST

5 Home Remedies for Blood Clot and Natural Treatment

Highlights

  • Blood flowing through veins is the most important fuel
  • Blood clots are simply amalgamation of red blood cells
  • Blood clot is a blockage of a healthy vessel that may lead to problems

Blood is the most important fuel required by the body as it helps in transporting nutrients to the cells and ensures smooth functioning of the system by supplying oxygen to various organs of the body. However, you may sometimes develop blood clots that can clog the arteries, further blocking the supply of nutrients to the vital organs. Blood clots are simply amalgamation of red blood cells that build up at the site of injury or due to a particular ailment. In some cases it can be healthy as it stops excessive bleeding in the body, however excessive clotting can be a sign of severe health problems like Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). In simpler terms, blood clot is a blockage of a healthy vessel that may lead to various health problems. A mass of red blood cells clump together and stop the blood flow in the vessel. Blood clots may not just form in one part of the body and can occur any where. Here are some amazing home remedies for blood clot. 

Blood Clot Symptoms

Blood clot symptoms may depend on where the clot may be located. Here are the various symptoms of blood clots in different areas of the body-

  • Heart- heaviness and pain in the chest, sweating, shortness of breath and discomfort in the upper area of the body
  • Lung- sharp chest pain, racing heart, sweating, coughing up blood and shortness of breath
  • Leg or arm– excessive pain, swelling, warm feeling in the affected area and cramps
  • Abdomen– abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting
  • Brain– vision issues, difficulty in speaking, severe headache and dizziness

Blood Clot Causes

Blood clots may be caused due to plaque formation in the arteries, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart diseases, cholesterol, internal injuries, obesity, liver diseases, smoking or anemia. 

Blood Clot Home Remedies and Natural Treatment

According to Nutritionist and Macrobiotic Health Coach Shilpa Arora, you must avoid inflammatory foods like white breads, cakes, pastries, cookies, refined oil and refined flours. All these foods tend to aggravate inflammation in the body, further causing blood clots.

Here are some home remedies for blood clots that you could probably try. 

1. Turmeric

The active compound present in turmeric known as curcumin works on the blood platelets to prevent clots. Its medicinal properties can also help in curing the pain caused due to the formation of clots. The bio-active properties of turmeric are said to be attributed to various components isolated from its rhizome. Turmeric acts as an anti-thrombotic or anti-coagulant agent, which involves modulation of numerous factors that aid in the process of clot formation. 
(Also Read: 5 Home Remedies to Control High Levels of Uric Acid)

The active compound present in turmeric known as curcumin works on the blood platelets​

2. Garlic

According to Nutritionist Shilpa, garlic has sulphur compounds that are known to melt blood clots. Consume one raw garlic clove in the morning for effective results. Garlic works on the smooth muscles of the arteries and causes them to relax and dilate, thereby lowering blood pressure. It also works as a blood thinner, thereby preventing blood clots in patients at risk for clots. 

Garlic has sulphur compounds that are known to melt blood clots​

3. Cayenne

Cayenne peppers are natural blood thinners and have an effective impact on your body due to the presence of salicylates in them. The compound capsaicin present in cayenne helps promote smooth blood circulation and helps prevent blood clots. The compound helps clear away artery-narrowing lipid deposits, and might help dilate arteries and blood vessels to clear away clots and the pain that comes with them. 

(Also Read: 7 Foods To Increase Blood Platelets)

Cayenne peppers are natural blood thinners and have an effective impact on your body​

4. Arjun ki Chhaal

According to Nutritionist Dr. Simran Saini from Fortis Hospital, Arjun ki chhaal or Terminalia Arjuna is a very effective natural blood thinner. All you need to do is take Arjun ki chhaal (bark) and soak it in warm water and drink the water every morning. Arjun ki chhaal promotes a stronger contraction of the heart muscle, allowing the heart to function efficiently. 

(Also Read: How To Improve Blood Circulation?)

Arjun ki chhaal or Terminalia Arjuna is a very effective natural blood thinner​

5. Flax Seeds and Chia Seeds

These tiny seeds are full of healthy omega-3 fatty acids that help in preventing blood clots and improve blood circulation. Flaxseeds are said to make platelets, the blood cells involved in clotting, less sticky. In fact, these seeds may reduce the risk of hardening of the arteries. Chia seeds are known to be natural blood thinners. They come packed with essential nutrients, especially omega-3 fatty acids that are good for the heart. 

(Also Read: 6 Summer Foods For Managing Blood Pressure)

Omega-3 fatty acids rich seeds are found in seeds including flax seeds

A good diet can go a long way in keeping you hale and hearty naturally.

Thank you for reading 🙂

Things That Happen When Your Diabetes Goes Untreated

When you hear “diabetes,” your mind likely jumps to problems with producing insulin and regulating blood sugar. And that’s definitely a key part of this chronic disease, which affects nearly 1 in 10 Americans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But that’s also just the tip of the iceberg.

“Diabetes is like termites, in that it causes slow, hidden, but significant damage in the body,” says Osama Hamdy, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Inpatient Diabetes Program at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. “Most patients with type 2 diabetes die from a heart attack,” Dr. Hamdy says, “but because the disease doesn’t have many symptoms, people tend to take it lightly.”

And evidence continues to mount that diabetes affects every system in the body, wreaking havoc if it’s not well managed. Learn more below about the side effects of diabetes and how you can protect yourself from complications. (The good news: Most can be avoided by following the treatment plan set out by your doctor.)

1) High blood pressure and cholesterol

When you have type 2 diabetes, your body can’t properly use insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar. In turn, your HDL (or “good”) cholesterol lowers, and your levels of harmful blood fats called triglycerides rise. Insulin resistance also contributes to hardened, narrow arteries, which in turn increases your blood pressure.

As a result, about 2 of 3 people with diabetes also have hypertension—a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and trouble with thinking and memory. Failing to control high blood pressure and high cholesterol, either with diet and exercise alone or by adding medications, accelerates the rate at which all your other complications progress, says Robert Gabbay, M.D., Ph.D., chief medical officer at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston.

2) Brain health issues

“It appears that people with diabetes have some abnormalities of blood flow control to the brain,” explains Helena Rodbard, M.D., an endocrinologist based in Maryland. “And this appears to be correlated with a more rapid loss of mental function with age,” she says, including the ability to plan, organize, remember things, prioritizes, pay attention, and get started on tasks.

To protect your brain health, you’ll want to stay active physically and mentally, logging at least 30 minutes of exercise a day and keeping your mind stimulated. “Read, socialize, work, and play games that challenge your intellect,” Dr. Rodbard says. “Keep a positive, optimistic attitude—don’t permit yourself to become depressed.”

3) Gum disease

People with diabetes are more likely to develop periodontal disease, an infection of the gum and bone that can lead to painful chewing problems and tooth loss. “This is due in part to elevated blood sugar that modifies the collagen in all of our tissues,” Dr. Rodbard says. “It’s also due to a slight increase in susceptibility to infections of all kinds.”

On the other hand, gum disease—specifically inflammation of the gums or development of deep abscesses—can raise blood sugar and make diabetes harder to control, according to Dr. Hamdy. To prevent periodontitis, brush and floss daily and consider using a mild antiseptic mouthwash to knock out any lingering plaque.

4) Sex difficulties

Many men with diabetes will experience some level of erectile dysfunction (ED) in their lifetime. “ED can be psychological or due to reduced testosterone,” Dr. Hamdy says, noting that low testosterone is common among people with diabetes, especially if they’re obese. “However, in patients with a long duration of diabetes, changes in blood vessels and nerve supply to the penis could be the cause.” If you have diabetes, are over age 40, and have been having trouble with your male equipment, see your doctor.

Middle-aged and older women with diabetes also tend to have sexual issues, according to a study of nearly 2,300 women published in Obstetrics & Gynecology, likely because nerve damage can impair lubrication and the ability to achieve orgasm.

5) Hearing loss

While we all lose some hearing as we age, hearing loss is twice as common in people with diabetes compared to those without the condition, according to the CDC. Diabetes may lead to hearing loss by damaging the small blood vessels and nerves in the inner ear, the CDC says.

The best way to protect your hearing is to keep your blood sugar levels in check, Dr. Rodbard says. In fact, in a study from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, older women with uncontrolled diabetes had more hearing loss than women the same age who had well-controlled diabetes. The CDC also suggests getting your hearing checked every year and avoiding other causes of hearing loss, like exposure to loud noises, when possible.

6) Skin infections

Having diabetes spikes your risk for all kinds of skin issues, including bacterial infections such as boils and urinary tract infections, fungal infections, and itching. “Fungal infections, especially yeast infections, are so common that they may even be the first sign of diabetes in someone who hasn’t yet been diagnosed,” Dr. Hamdy says.

In some cases, skin infections can be tied to obesity, because there are “moist places between skin folds that may breed bacteria and fungi, including candida,” Dr. Rodbard says.

Unfortunately, several diabetes medications increase the risk of fungal infections of the genitalia, Dr. Hamdy says, because they enhance glucose excretion in urine, fueling the growth of bacteria and fungus. Controlling blood sugar levels helps with prevention, but once you have an infection, seek out the usual treatments: over-the-counter antifungal vaginal creams and suppositories, to be used as directed.

7) Obstructive sleep apnea

This potentially serious sleep disorder, in which the throat muscles intermittently relax and block the airway during sleep, affects around 50% of people with diabetes, Dr. Hamdy says, especially those who are obese and have a collar size of more than 17 for men and 16 for women.

The most obvious sign of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is audible snoring. Unfortunately, like gum disease, “sleep apnea may worsen diabetes control,” Dr. Hamdy says, possibly because the two conditions share risk factors. Treatment for OSA may involve using a device to keep your airway open at night or wearing a mouthpiece that thrusts your jaw forward. In severe cases, surgery can help by altering the structure of the nose, mouth, or throat.

8) Vision problems

Roughly 1 in 3 people with diabetes older than age 40 have diabetic retinopathy or damage to the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. This happens because elevated blood glucose levels over time harm the eye’s delicate blood vessels, a process that can begin as early as 7 years before diagnosis.

The good news is, treating these problems early can reduce the risk of blindness by 95%, per the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).

9) Kidney failure

Over time, high blood glucose thickens and scars the nephrons, tiny structures within the kidneys that filter your blood. About 7% of the time, you’ll already have protein leaking into your urine—an early sign of kidney problems—by the time you receive a type 2 diabetes diagnosis.

About half of those who don’t take steps to control their diabetes will sustain kidney damage within 10 years, and 40% of those will progress to kidney failure, a condition requiring either dialysis or a kidney transplant, says Betul Hatipoglu, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic.

10) Neuropathy

About half of people with type 2 diabetes will develop neuropathy, the most common diabetes complication. At first, you might have no symptoms or feel a mild tingling or numbness in your hands or feet, says Dr. Gabbay. But eventually, this form of nerve damage can cause pain, weakness, and digestive troubles as it strikes the nerves that control your gastrointestinal tract.

In addition to managing your blood sugar, being physically active, eating a healthy diet, and keeping up with recommended medications can help prevent diabetes-related nerve damage, the NIDDK says.

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Boost Your Immune System~

Eat fruits & vegetables every day: Produce contains key vitamins involved in the immune system. Vitamin C in foods like strawberries, bell peppers, broccoli, and citrus, helps immune system cells function, including phagocytes (the kind that engulfs potentially harmful particles). Vitamin A helps keep tissues in the mouth, intestines, and respiratory tract healthy and is found in sweet potatoes, spinach, carrots, and cantaloupe. Remember that eating the actual fruit or veggie is better than popping single-vitamin supplements since it’s likely that all the components in the food interact to offer protection.

Get plenty of protein: Getting too little protein can weaken your immune system. Protein-rich foods supply the amino acids you need to build essential proteins in the body, including antibodies. Animal foods like beef and pork also contain zinc, a mineral that your body uses to make t-cells (you can find zinc in cashews and chickpeas too).

Include fermented foods: These are foods that are naturally preserved by bacteria, and they’re good for the “microbiome”. That’s the name for the trillions of bacteria that live in your gut, where a lot of cells involved in immunity actually reside. Fermented foods like yogurt (look for the term “live and active cultures” on the label), kefir, sauerkraut, miso, and kimchi help beneficial bacteria flourish in the gut, leaving less room for harmful bugs.

Season your meals: Every plant food has its own unique compounds that offer potential health-boosting benefits. Spices and seasonings like garlic, ginger, oregano, and cinnamon have all been researched for intriguing capabilities as anti-microbials, anti-inflammatories, and cell-protecting antioxidants. They’re not magic cure-alls, and popping them in the form of pills isn’t the same as eating the real deal. But adding flavor to foods with these ingredients means you’re getting even more beneficial compounds in the meals you eat every day.

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