Tag: Meditation

Guided Meditation~Cultivating Equanimity

Thank you for reading 🙂

Meditate~How To, Videos, And More

When we meditate, we inject far-reaching and long-lasting benefits into our lives: We lower our stress levels, we get to know our pain, we connect better, we improve our focus, and we’re kinder to ourselves. Let us walk you through the basics in our new mindful guide on how to meditate.

  • BY MINDFUL STAFF
  • JANUARY 31, 2019
  • MEDITATION
moneti/https://www.mindful.org/how-to-meditate/Adobe Stock

This is a guidebook to the many different styles of meditation, the various benefits of each practice, plus free guided audio practices that help you learn how to meditate.

How do you learn to meditate? In mindfulness meditation, we’re learning how to pay attention to the breath as it goes in and out, and notice when the mind wanders from this task. This practice of returning to the breath builds the muscles of attention and mindfulness.

When we pay attention to our breath, we are learning how to return to, and remain in, the present moment—to anchor ourselves in the here and now on purpose, without judgement.

In mindfulness practice, we are learning how to return to, and remain in, the present moment—to anchor ourselves in the here and now on purpose, without judgement.

The idea behind mindfulness seems simple—the practice takes patience. Indeed, renowned meditation teacher Sharon Salzberg recounts that her first experience with meditation showed her how quickly the mind gets caught up in other tasks. “I thought, okay, what will it be, like, 800 breaths before my mind starts to wander? And to my absolute amazement, it was one breath, and I’d be gone,” says Salzberg.

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER

Get mindfulness meditation practices, research, and special offers from our Mindful community delivered to you.

While meditation isn’t a cure-all, it can certainly provide some much-needed space in your life. Sometimes, that’s all we need to make better choices for ourselves, our families, and our communities. And the most important tools you can bring with you to your meditation practice are a little patience, some kindness for yourself, and a comfortable place to sit.


A Basic Meditation for Beginners

The first thing to clarify: What we’re doing here is aiming for mindfulness, not some process that magically wipes your mind clear of the countless and endless thoughts that erupt and ping constantly in our brains. We’re just practicing bringing our attention to our breath, and then back to the breath when we notice our attention has wandered.

  1. Get comfortable and prepare to sit still for a few minutes. After you stop reading this, you’re going to simply focus on your own natural inhaling and exhaling of breath.
  2. Focus on your breath. Where do you feel your breath most? In your belly? In your nose? Try to keep your attention on your inhale and exhale.
  3. Follow your breath for two minutes. Take a deep inhale, expanding your belly, and then exhale slowly, elongating the out-breath as your belly contracts.

Welcome back. What happened? How long was it before your mind wandered away from your breath? Did you notice how busy your mind was even without consciously directing it to think about anything in particular? Did you notice yourself getting caught up in thoughts before you came back to reading this? We often have little narratives running in our minds that we didn’t choose to put there, like: “Why DOES my boss want to meet with me tomorrow?” “I should have gone to the gym yesterday.” “I’ve got to pay some bills” or (the classic) “I don’t have time to sit still, I’ve got stuff to do.”

We “practice” mindfulness so we can learn how to recognize when our minds are doing their normal everyday acrobatics, and maybe take a pause from that for just a little while so we can choose what we’d like to focus on.

If you experienced these sorts of distractions (and we all do), you’ve made an important discovery: simply put, that’s the opposite of mindfulness. It’s when we live in our heads, on automatic pilot, letting our thoughts go here and there, exploring, say, the future or the past, and essentially, not being present in the moment. But that’s where most of us live most of the time—and pretty uncomfortably, if we’re being honest, right? But it doesn’t have to be that way.

We “practice” mindfulness so we can learn how to recognize when our minds are doing their normal everyday acrobatics, and maybe take a pause from that for just a little while so we can choose what we’d like to focus on. In a nutshell, meditation helps us have a much healthier relationship with ourselves (and, by extension, with others).

WHY LEARN TO MEDITATE?


When we meditate, we inject far-reaching and long-lasting benefits into our lives. And bonus: you don’t need any extra gear or an expensive membership.

Here are five reasons to meditate:

1: Understand your pain
2: Lower your stress
3: Connect better
4: Improve focus
5: Reduce brain chatter


How to Meditate

Meditation is simpler (and harder) than most people think. Read these steps, make sure you’re somewhere where you can relax into this process, set a timer, and give it a shot:

1) Take a seat

Find a place to sit that feels calm and quiet to you.

2) Set a time limit

If you’re just beginning, it can help to choose a short time, such as five or 10 minutes.

3) Notice your body

You can sit in a chair with your feet on the floor, you can sit loosely cross-legged, you can kneel—all are fine. Just make sure you are stable and in a position you can stay in for a while.

4) Feel your breath

Follow the sensation of your breath as it goes in and as it goes out.

5) Notice when your mind has wandered

Inevitably, your attention will leave the breath and wander to other places. When you get around to noticing that your mind has wandered—in a few seconds, a minute, five minutes—simply return your attention to the breath.

6) Be kind to your wandering mind

Don’t judge yourself or obsess over the content of the thoughts you find yourself lost in. Just come back.

7) Close with kindness 

When you’re ready, gently lift your gaze (if your eyes are closed, open them). Take a moment and notice any sounds in the environment. Notice how your body feels right now. Notice your thoughts and emotions.

That’s it! That’s the practice. You go away, you come back, and you try to do it as kindly as possible.


Meditation 101: The Basics

Try this 3-part guided audio series from Barry Boyce:

How long would you like to meditate? Sometimes we only have time for a quick check-in, sometimes we can dip in a little longer. Meditating every day helps build awareness, fosters resilience, and lowers stress. Try to make meditation a habit by practicing with these short meditations from our Editor-in-Chief Barry Boyce. Find time to sit once a day for one month and see what you notice.

1-Minute Meditation

  • 2:36

A short practice for settling the mind, intended for doing in the middle of the day, wherever you are out in the world.

10-Minute Meditation

  • 10:28

A longer practice that explores meditation posture, breathing techniques, and working with thoughts and emotions as they surface during mindfulness practice.

15-Minute Meditation

  • 15:54

A practice that explores sitting in formal meditation for longer periods of time.

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER

Get mindfulness meditation practices, research, and special offers from our Mindful community delivered to you.

Meditation Tips and Techniques:

We’ve gone over the basic breath meditation so far, but there are other mindfulness techniques that use different focal points than the breath to anchor our attention—external objects like a sound in the room, or something broader, such as noticing spontaneous things that come into your awareness during an aimless wandering practice. We’ve tapped mindfulness teacher Elisha Goldstein to craft our premium How to Meditate Course. If you’re interested in learning various meditation techniques to help you find focus, feel peace, and uncover your inner power, please explore our Mindful Online Learning School.

Try this free sample of our How to Meditate Course: Making Mindfulness a Habit—with Dr. Elisha Goldstein.FREE SAMPLE OF HOW TO MEDITATE COURSE

How to Make Mindfulness a Habit

It’s estimated that 95% of our behavior runs on autopilot. That’s because neural networks underlie all of our habits, reducing our millions of sensory inputs per second into manageable shortcuts so we can function in this crazy world. These default brain signals are so efficient that they often cause us to relapse into old behaviors before we remember what we meant to do instead.

Mindfulness is the exact opposite of these default processes. It’s executive control rather than autopilot, and enables intentional actions, willpower, and decisions. But that takes practice. The more we activate the intentional brain, the stronger it gets. Every time we do something deliberate and new, we stimulate neuroplasticity, activating our grey matter, which is full of newly sprouted neurons that have not yet been groomed for “autopilot” brain. 

But here’s the problem: While our intentional brain knows what is best for us, our autopilot brain causes us to shortcut our way through life. So how can we trigger ourselves to be mindful when we need it most? This is where the notion of “behavior design” comes in. It’s a way to put your intentional brain in the driver’s seat. There are two ways to do that—first, slowing down the autopilot brain by putting obstacles in its way, and second, removing obstacles in the path of the intentional brain, so it can gain control.

Shifting the balance to give your intentional brain more power takes some work, though. Here are some ways to get started. 

  • Put meditation reminders around you. If you intend to do some yoga or to meditate, put your yoga mat or your meditation cushion in the middle of your floor so you can’t miss it as you walk by. 
  • Refresh your reminders regularly. Say you decide to use sticky notes to remind yourself of a new intention. That might work for about a week, but then your autopilot brain and old habits take over again. Try writing new notes to yourself; add variety or make them funny. That way they’ll stick with you longer. 
  • Create new patterns. You could try a series of “If this, then that” messages to create easy reminders to shift into the intentional brain. For instance, you might come up with, “If office door, then deep breath,” as a way to shift into mindfulness as you are about to start your workday. Or, “If phone rings, take a breath before answering.” Each intentional action to shift into mindfulness will strengthen your intentional brain.

More Styles of Mindfulness Meditation

Once you have explored a basic seated meditation practice, you might want to consider other forms of meditation including walking and lying down. Whereas the previous meditations used the breath as a focal point for practice, these meditations below focus on different parts of the body.

Introduction to the Body Scan Meditation

man meditating in chair, illustration

Try this: feel your feet on the ground right now. In your shoes or without, it doesn’t matter. Then track or scan over your whole body, bit by bit—slowly—all the way up to the crown of your head. The point of this practice is to check in with your whole body: Fingertips to shoulders, butt to big toe. Only rules are: No judging, no wondering, no worrying (all activities your mind may want to do); just check in with the physical feeling of being in your body. Aches and pains are fine. You don’t have to do anything about anything here. You’re just noticing.

Body Scan Meditation

  • 25:41

A brief body awareness practice for tuning in to sensations, head-to-toe.

Begin to focus your attention on different parts of your body. You can spotlight one particular area or go through a sequence like this: toes, feet (sole, heel, top of foot), through the legs, pelvis, abdomen, lower back, upper back, chest shoulders, arms down to the fingers, shoulders, neck, different parts of the face, and head. For each part of the body, linger for a few moments and notice the different sensations as you focus.

The moment you notice that your mind has wandered, return your attention to the part of the body you last remember.

If you fall asleep during this body-scan practice, that’s okay. When you realize you’ve been nodding off, take a deep breath to help you reawaken and perhaps reposition your body (which will also help wake it up). When you’re ready, return your attention to the part of the body you last remember focusing on.

Introduction to the Walking Meditation

Fact: Most of us live pretty sedentary lives, leaving us to build extra-curricular physical activity into our days to counteract all that. Point is: Mindfulness doesn’t have to feel like another thing on your to-do list. It can be injected into some of the activities you’re already doing. Here’s how to integrate a mindful walking practice into your day.

Walking Meditation

  • 8:58

A mindful movement practice for bringing awareness to what we feel with each step.

As you begin, walk at a natural pace. Place your hands wherever comfortable: on your belly, behind your back, or at your sides.

  • If you find it useful, you can count steps up to 10, and then start back at one again. If you’re in a small space, as you reach ten, pause, and with intention, choose a moment to turn around.
  • With each step, pay attention to the lifting and falling of your foot. Notice movement in your legs and the rest of your body. Notice any shifting of your body from side to side.
  • Whatever else captures your attention, come back to the sensation of walking. Your mind will wander, so without frustration, guide it back again as many times as you need.
  • Particularly outdoors, maintain a larger sense of the environment around you, taking it all in, staying safe and aware.

Introduction to Loving-Kindness Meditation

You cannot will yourself into particular feelings toward yourself or anyone else. Rather, you can practice reminding yourself that you deserve happiness and ease and that the same goes for your child, your family, your friends, your neighbors, and everyone else in the world.

A Loving-Kindness Meditation

  • 17:49

Explore this practice to extend compassion to yourself, those around you, and the larger world.

This loving-kindness practice involves silently repeating phrases that offer good qualities to oneself and to others.

  1. You can start by taking delight in your own goodness—calling to mind things you have done out of good-heartedness, and rejoicing in those memories to celebrate the potential for goodness we all share.
  2. Silently recite phrases that reflect what we wish most deeply for ourselves in an enduring way. Traditional phrases are:
    • May I live in safety.
    • May I have mental happiness (peace, joy).
    • May I have physical happiness (health, freedom from pain).
    • May I live with ease.
  3. Repeat the phrases with enough space and silence between so they fall into a rhythm that is pleasing to you. Direct your attention to one phrase at a time.
  4. Each time you notice your attention has wandered, be kind to yourself and let go of the distraction. Come back to repeating the phrases without judging or disparaging yourself.
  5. After some time, visualize yourself in the center of a circle composed of those who have been kind to you, or have inspired you because of their love. Perhaps you’ve met them, or read about them; perhaps they live now, or have existed historically or even mythically. That is the circle. As you visualize yourself in the center of it, experience yourself as the recipient of their love and attention. Keep gently repeating the phrases of loving-kindness for yourself.
  6. To close the session, let go of the visualization, and simply keep repeating the phrases for a few more minutes. Each time you do so, you are transforming your old, hurtful relationship to yourself, and are moving forward, sustained by the force of kindness.

MORE GUIDED MEDITATION PRACTICES

The RAIN Meditation with Tara Brach

  • 11:42

A practice for difficult emotions, RAIN is an acronym for Recognition of what is going on; Acceptance of the experience, just as it is; Interest in what is happening; and Nurture with loving presence.

A Mindfulness Practice to Foster Forgiveness

  • 11:13

Explore this practice to let go of the tendency to add to our suffering during challenging situations.


Thank you for reading 🙂

Meditation To Help Us Be Better Humans

The Alternative Daily’s CEO, Jake Carney, feels his meditation practice, Kelee® meditation, has helped him improve his life. Wouldn’t you love to become a better person too, just by meditating? Well you can, and it’s easy to do.

The best thing about this meditation is, it doesn’t change you into someone you’re not. It helps you to let go of the parts you would like to let go of. It enhances the real you. You know, the good parts — the things you love about yourself — the things that make you, you. Doing this practice gives your thoughts clarity: your thoughts about what to do, and your thoughts about your life. This is something good to know in a world that seems filled with people telling us how we should be, and what we should do. If you could see clearly what is best for you, wouldn’t you do it?

Here are some ways Kelee meditation can help you:

You feel better physically

“When your mind lights up with a good thought, your physical body follows suit.” A quote from the book, The Mind and Self-Reflection by author Ron W. Rathbun.

While surfing, Jake, experienced this firsthand. He’d had “one of those days” at work and was out on the ocean but not “feeling the vibe.” He got a little frustrated, then decided to try and “drop into his mind,” right there on the water. So he dropped into his Kelee and detached from the thoughts bothering him. He waited patiently for the next wave, and it was one of the best rides of his life! Dropping into your greater Kelee, which is an opening to the mind, is not some abstract thought. It’s real, and you can use it to help yourself every day in your life.

You naturally become a better listener

A wise person observes more and talks less. Through this practice brain chatter lessens, and you naturally hear more of what others are saying.

You talk from your heart

Speaking from your heart means never having to apologize for saying something you didn’t mean. When you do Kelee meditation, you naturally speak from your heart, and your whole life gets simpler.

You mind your own business

Have you ever gotten into someone else’s business, then wish you hadn’t. We are responsible for ourselves. This meditation practice focuses you on your thoughts, and your life.

You become less dramatic

“If you make something an issue, it will be. Do you create issues for yourself or others, and why.” When you live from the harmony of mind, you don’t make issues. Being dramatic is really just a waste of everyone’s energy anyway.

You learn to say, “No, thank you”

When you learn to respect yourself more — your thoughts and your feelings — you respect your own space. From The Mind and Self-Reflection, “If you never learn how to say no thank you, people never learn to respect your space. Do you respect your space.”

You let others work out their problems

It doesn’t help to get involved in other people’s problems. Most people don’t want to be told what to do anyway. When you are in mind, you focus on your life. Isn’t that enough?

We recommend doing this meditation. It is a simple, five-minute meditation based on stillness of mind — and you can do it at home. For instructions, download this simple ebook, Kelee Meditation: Free your Mind, and begin becoming a better person today.

—Nikki Walsh

Nikki Walsh is a freelance writer and mom of two kids living in Southern California. She holds an MBA in marketing from University of California, Irvine and a bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry from UCSD. She has been practicing Kelee meditation for 19 years. When she is not writing she can be found out and about having fun with her kids.

©2016 with permission of the Kelee Foundation.

Thank you for reading 🙂

Aligned Your Chakra Lately?

5 Signs You Need To Align Your Chakras ASAP

Liivi Hess 43.6 Kviews

If you’re feeling run down, lacking in energy, depressed or unhealthy, it’s possible that your chakras are out of alignment.

Maintaining a healthy body and mind that are perfectly in balance with one another is a difficult, near-impossible endeavor. This process, called homeostasis, can provide the means by which we achieve harmony between all the different chemicals, hormones, microorganisms and more. The further we move away from this harmonized state of being, the greater our chances of both physical and mental illness are.

Balancing your chakras provides an age-old mechanism with which you can return your body and consciousness back to homeostasis, and keep it that way.

What exactly are “chakras?”

Aligning your chakras can help you achieve well-being

Simply put, your chakras are the locations at which your spirit and physical body meet. Thought to have been officially standardized under eighth-century Buddhist Tantra teachings, ancient custom dictates that there are seven primary meeting points between the subtle (non-physical) energy channels of the body. These channels, known as “nadi,” are believed to be the channels in the subtle body through which your life force moves.

The word “chakra” is an ancient Sanskrit word meaning “wheel,” “circle” and “cycle.” This should help you to visualize how chakras are understood to operate. Your chakras are constantly moving bands of energy that circulate within specific zones of your body… like a moving wheel. While there are many chakras understood to exist within the body, most practitioners focus on the seven “major” chakras:

Root chakra

Located at the base of the spine, this is otherwise known as Muladhara, the earth chakra. Your root chakra is red in color. It is associated with feelings of safety and security.

Sacral chakra

Located below the belly button in the upper pelvic region, this chakra is known through ancient custom as Svadisthana. It’s orange in color. It is considered the water chakra (you’d think it’d be blue). It is associated with pleasure, acceptance and creativeness.

Solar plexus chakra

Located at the point where your ribs meet your abdomen, just above the naval, this chakra is known as Manipura, the fire chakra. Manipura is believed to be responsible for your digestion and diaphragmatic functions. It is associated with feelings of control and self-worth.

Heart chakra

Located, funnily enough, at the center of your chest, this is known as Anahata, the air chakra. Anahata is green. It is associated with feelings of love and inner peace.

Throat chakra

Blue in color, this chakra is known as Visuddha, the ether chakra. Responsible for your taste, speech and eating abilities, Visuddha’s purpose is to enable both inward and outward communication.

Third eye chakra

Located between your eyes, this chakra, otherwise known as Ajna, is that of the light. Indigo in color, Ajna enables physical sight and internal decision making.

Crown chakra

Thought to be either located at the top of the head or just above it, Sahasrara is the violet chakra, representing cosmic energy. Your crown chakra is responsible for maintaining mental peace and connectedness.

If this is all seeming a bit too hocus pocus for your taste, simply think of chakras as energy bands. The universe is energy — it’s a scientific fact. Therefore, it stands to reason that our own bodies are governed by certain energy wavelengths. A convenient way to enable understanding of these energy bands is through the system of chakras. There. Feeling better about the subject now?

Reasons to align your chakras

Whether you like it or not, your body and mind are heavily influenced by your own energy and the energy of others. Those energy fields, conveniently compartmentalized into distinct chakras, dictate whether you feel vibrant and full of life or lethargic and down in the dumps. Aligning your chakras so that they’re perfectly balanced and in tune with each other helps to get you feeling energized and whole once more. Here’s a number of reasons why you need to align your chakras.

Misaligned chakras can cause physical problems

Misaligned chakras are said to cause many issues, like digestive distress.
Misaligned chakras are said to cause many issues, like digestive distress.

Often, if you’re suffering from certain ailments of the body but can’t for the life of you work out why, it may be due to an imbalance in your chakras. Here are some of the symptoms associated with chakras that are out of alignment:

  • Bladder and bowel issues
  • Breathing problems
  • Circulation issues
  • Dental issues
  • Digestive complications
  • Headaches
  • Immune disorders
  • Lower back pain
  • Low libido
  • Skin problems
  • Reproductive issues
  • Vision problems

Misaligned chakras can cause mental issues

Because the chakras represent your spiritual life force, they can arguably play an even more influential role in dictating your emotions and mental health. If you’re suffering from any of the following issues, it could be due to a problem with one of many of your chakras:

  • Addictions
  • Anger issues
  • Abusiveness towards yourself or others
  • Boredom (with life, others or your job)
  • Close-heartedness
  • Depression
  • Eating disorders
  • Indecision
  • Insecure
  • Jealousy
  • Lack of creativity
  • Lack of motivation
  • Lack of willpower
  • Moodiness
  • Resentment

Aligning your chakras can help you achieve overall balance

Together, your chakras represent your entire self: physical, spiritual and emotional. For this reason, they provide the means by which you can achieve overall balance in your life — that evasive homeostasis I discussed earlier. By devoting a little bit of time to actively visualizing and supporting each of your chakras, you help to improve each area of yourself. By taking a few minutes every day to focus your awareness on each of the seven chakras, you will subtly but surely promote the attributes it represents.

Aligning your chakras can increase self-awareness

This sounds like an inconsequential benefit, but it’s actually kind of a big deal! By developing an awareness of your chakras, you unlock the potential to become adept at self-diagnosing. Not in the sense that a doctor diagnoses you by asking what symptoms are (“cough now”) then prescribing some form of nasty medication, but in the sense that you can ascertain where you’re feeling weak or ill and focus your energy on that region to reattain homeostasis. Essentially, by looking for ebbs and flows in your chakras, you can pinpoint elusive problems in your health and resolve them… without knocking back vast quantities of drugs.

Aligning your chakras can help you to achieve well-being

Chances are, if you haven’t been living under a rock for the past couple of decades, you’ve heard of yoga. Yoga, as it happens, draws much of its mantra from the chakra system. In fact, many modern forms of meditation derive much of their essence from this understanding of energy flow between the major chakras. All acknowledge, in some way or form, that your consciousness is spread across all seven chakras, and that aligning them all brings a state of harmony and well-being. In this sense, aligning your chakras is like being in a state of meditation all the time, allowing you to achieve effortless calm and support a life rich in beauty and happiness.

How to align the chakras

Find a quiet spot to align your chakras.
Find a quiet spot to align your chakras.

There are plenty of ways in which you can go about achieving chakra greatness — just about everyone in the business has their own special method. But, as usual, simplicity is key and this method is an age-old way to align your chakras quickly and effectively:

1. Lie down in a comfortable spot away from the hustle and bustle of life. This might be your bedroom or a quiet spot on the grass under the trees — whatever it takes to minimize disturbance from discomfort and the stresses of life.

2. Take a few minutes to just lie there and breathe deeply, clearing your mind of all that everyday fuzz and becoming centered with your body.

3. Now set an intention for balancing and aligning your chakras. Apparently, the energy listens to your intentions, so this actually makes a lot of sense!

4. Place one of your hands on your first chakra (the one at the base of your spine), and another hand on your second chakra (your sacral chakra, just below your belly button). You can physically rest your hands on these areas, or allow them to hover a few inches above the body — it’s your choice.

5. Keep your hands in this position until you feel the energy between the two chakras equalize. This may be a pulsating feeling, or simply a feeling that it’s time to move onto the next chakras. If you don’t feel anything conclusive, don’t worry — simply move on after a minute or two.

6. Move your hands to your second and third chakras, and repeat this process all the way up to the seventh chakra. After you’ve balanced all the chakras, take a few minutes to simply lie there and soak in the feeling of wholeness.

Make a point of doing this every day and you’ll not only kick stress right in the unmentionables, but you’ll become much more in tune with your own body. Goodbye, doctor. Hello, chakras!

Thank you for reading 🙂