Word Of The Week

schlep

verb (used with object)

to carry; lug: to schlep an umbrella on a sunny day.

LOOK IT UP

WHAT IS THE ORIGIN OF SCHLEP?

The slang term schlep “to lug, carry” is used mostly in the United States. Schlep is from the Yiddish verb shlepn “to pull, drag” (German schleppen “to draw, tug, haul”). The derivative noun schlepper, “one who schleps,” appears slightly earlier than the verb. Schlepper entered English toward the end of the 19th century; schlep appeared in the early 20th.

HOW IS SCHLEP USED?

She had drawn notice as the doctor who would help mechanics schlep gear, fetch coffee and even massage the overworked massage therapists. NANCY LOFHOLM, “CRESTED BUTTE SURGEON SCORES TOP SPOT AT SOCHI OLYMPICS,” DENVER POST, JANUARY 11, 2014

After a bit of trial and error, you’ll find car-free travel is a liberating choice that forces you to schlep considerably less. LAUREN MATISON, “HOW TO TRAVEL CAR-FREE WITH A FAMILY,” NEW YORK TIMES, DECEMBER 4, 2019

LISTEN TO THE WORD OF THE DAY

schlep

Play Podcast

00:00/01:02

Feel free to comment below

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s