Word of the Week

fistic

fis-tik ] 

adjective

of boxing; pugilistic.

LOOK IT UP LEARN ABOUT THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE Search

WHAT IS THE ORIGIN OF FISTIC?

Fistic “pertaining to the fists or boxing” is a transparent compound of the English noun fist and the adjective suffix –icFist comes from Old English fȳst and is closely related to Dutch vuist and German Faust. The thoroughly naturalized suffix –ic derives from Latin –icus and Greek –ikos and was originally applied to Latin or Greek nouns (such as metallicmusicpoeticpublic). Fistic is a facetious synonym of pugilistic, which is a derivative of Latin pugil “fist fighter, boxer.” Pugil is akin to pugna “fist” and its derived verb pugnāre “to fight,” ultimate source of English pugnacious. All of the Latin words are related to the Greek adverb pýx “with the fist,” and the noun pygmḗ “fist, fistfight, boxing,” also a measure of length from the elbow to the knuckles (of the fist). Fistic entered English in the early 19th century.

HOW IS FISTIC USED?

Yes, boxing and the other fistic and grappling arts are still with us, driven by the popularity of mixed martial arts and Ultimate Mixed Fighting bouts.WILLIAM PORTER, “METRO DENVER GYMS OFFER A WORKOUT FOR EVERYONE,” DENVER POST, JULY 7, 2014

To continue in fistic phraseology, he had a genius for coming up to the scratch, wherever and whatever it was, and proving himself an ugly customer. … He was certain to knock the wind out of common sense …CHARLES DICKENS, HARD TIMES, 1854

LISTEN TO THE WORD OF THE DAY

fistic

Play Podcast

00:00/01:42

SUBSCRIBE

Feel free to comment below

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s