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Signs That Could Indicate Heart Disease/Information Share

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/healthy-heart/six-unusual-signs-that-may-indicate-heart-disease/ar-AAveu74?ocid=spartandhp

1. Creased earlobes

One such external indicator is diagonal creases on the earlobes — known as Frank’s sign, named after Sanders Frank, an American doctor who first described the sign. Studies have shown that there is an association with the visible external crease on the earlobe and increased risk of atherosclerosis, a disease where plaque builds up inside your arteries.

Over 40 studies have demonstrated an association between this feature of the ear and an increased risk of atherosclerosis. It is not clear what the cause of the association is, but some have postulated that it is to do with a shared embryological origin. Most recently, it has been seen that these creases are also implicated in cerebrovascular disease — disease of the blood vessels in the brain.

2. Fatty bumps

Another external indicator of heart issues is yellow, fatty bumps — known clinically as “xanthomas” — that can appear on the elbows, knees, buttocks or eyelids. The bumps themselves are harmless, but they can be a sign of bigger problems.

close up of arcus senilis during ophthalmic examination. © ARZTSAMUI/Shutterstock close up of arcus senilis during ophthalmic examination.

Xanthomas are most commonly seen in people with a genetic disease called familial hypercholesterolemia. People with this condition have exceptionally high levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol — so-called “bad cholesterol”. The levels of this cholesterol are so high they become deposited in the skin. Unfortunately, these fatty deposits are also laid down in arteries that supply the heart.

The mechanism that causes these fatty deposits in tissues is understood and it holds an iconic place in medicine as it led to the development of one of the blockbuster group of drugs that reduce cholesterol: statins.

3. Clubbed fingernails

A phenomenon known as digital clubbing may also be a sign that all is not well with your heart. This is where the fingernails change shape, becoming thicker and wider, due to more tissue being produced. The change is usually painless and happens on both hands.

The reason this change indicates heart issues is because oxygenated blood is not reaching the fingers properly and so the cells produce a “factor” that promotes growth to try and rectify the issue.

Clubbing of the fingers is the oldest known medical symptom. It was first described by Hippocrates in the fifth-century BC. This is why clubbed fingers are sometimes known as Hippocratic fingers.

4. Halo around the iris

Fat deposits may also be seen in the eye, as a grey ring around the outside of the iris, the coloured part of the eye. This so-called “arcus senilis”, starts at the top and bottom of the iris before progressing to form a complete ring. It doesn’t interfere with vision.

About 45% of people over the age of 40 have this fatty halo around their iris, rising to about 70% of people over the age of 60. The presence of this fatty ring has been shown to be associated with some of the risk factors for coronary heart disease.

5. Rotten gums and loose teeth

The state of your oral health can also be a good predictor of the state of your cardiovascular health. The mouth is full of bacteria, both good and bad. The “bad” bacteria can enter the bloodstream from the mouth and cause inflammation in the blood vessels, which can lead to cardiovascular disease.

Studies have shown that tooth loss and inflamed gums (periodontitis) are markers of heart disease.

6. Blue lips

Another health indicator from the mouth is the colour of your lips. The lips are usually red, but they can take on a bluish colour (cyanosis) in people with heart problems, due to the failure of the cardiovascular system to deliver oxygenated blood to tissues.

Of course, people also get blue lips if they are extremely cold or have been at a high altitude. In this case, blue lips are probably just due to a temporary lack of oxygen and will resolve quite quickly.

In fact, the other five symptoms — mentioned above — can also have a benign cause. But if you are worried or in doubt, you should contact your GP or other healthcare professional for an expert opinion.

Adam Taylor is director of the Clinical Anatomy Learning Centre and a senior lecturer at Lancaster University.

© ARZTSAMUI/Shutterstock close up of arcus senilis during ophthalmic examination.
Xanthomas are most commonly seen in people with a genetic disease called familial hypercholesterolemia. People with this condition have exceptionally high levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol — so-called “bad cholesterol”. The levels of this cholesterol are so high they become deposited in the skin. Unfortunately, these fatty deposits are also laid down in arteries that supply the heart.
The mechanism that causes these fatty deposits in tissues is understood and it holds an iconic place in medicine as it led to the development of one of the blockbuster group of drugs that reduce cholesterol: statins.

Pieces from a torn heart

 

blue-torn-heart-vector-illustration-30630399

Hurt but never too tired to fight.  Drifting in this mindless game, afraid to let doubt enter my brain.

I hear all those voices that tell me to turn and walk away, but I’m too stubborn to do it that way.

 I have lots of love that keeps my heart strong.

Although there are pieces scattered from the wrong that has damaged my heart.

I cry the kind of tears that lets out pain.

I also  have tears that keep the rest of me sane.

Being me has paid a toll for sure. I can feel it when I second guess my self, and when I am alone to think.

Pieces of a torn heart will never again be whole but somewhere, some way I manage to keep my soul.

Whispers fill my mind with doubt, snaps from conversations with those I love remind me of how little I matter at times.

It is hard to take but I somehow mange to let it leave my consciousness so I can continue, yet again.

I fall sometimes so hard, I swear I am forever broken.  Guess what though? I seem to rise despite the hurt from it all.

As if I was a rubber band, I snap back and look in place where I belong.

 Is it me or does everyone have some sort of torn heart? I know I am not the only one whose pieces are all out of sorts.

The days I live through seem to have a beginning and an end to them, yet I repeat moments in my life over, and over again.

Almost like a clown working for another’s applause or attention, I find myself saying things and doing things I thought I had forgotten how to.

It seems I have a mechanism that I use to hold my heart’s pieces together.

It is one that hold’s tightly to the slightest of joys, the weakest of effort, and the humbling of pride for even a milli- second. It is when I need to and with whomever, or whatever is my focus. 


If you have pieces of a torn heart, do you find something quick enough to grab all them and hold them in place? Or do you take your time and give each piece attention needed for as long as it takes to get them put back right? I guess that would be a matter of personal choice.

I would think that if you can you will try to fix the cracks or tears or at least you would do the best job to make it whole again, despite the time it takes or the effort you have to put forth. As so you should.

 Hearts were made to take the worst but give the best. They are special. If you are lucky enough for someone to give you theirs, try and take good care of it. If it gets torn and damaged it will never truly be the same.