Tag: Eggs

Ketogenic Baked Eggs With Avocado and Zoodles

keto baked eggs and zoodles with avocado recipe
https://www.purewow.com/food/mediterranean-diet-meal-plan

2 servings

Ingredients~

Nonstick spray

3 zucchini, spiralized into noodles

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

4 large eggs

Red-pepper flakes, for garnishing

Fresh basil, for garnishing

2 avocados, halved and thinly sliced

Directions~

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly grease a baking sheet with nonstick spray.

2. In a large bowl, toss the zucchini noodles and olive oil to combine. Season with salt and pepper. Divide into 4 even portions, transfer to the baking sheet and shape each into a nest.

3. Gently crack an egg into the center of each nest. Bake until the eggs are set, 9 to 11 minutes. Season with salt and pepper; garnish with red-pepper flakes and basil. Serve alongside the avocado slices.

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Crumb Covered Poached Eggs

Canal House's Crispy Egg - HERO - V1 / Photo by Joseph De Leo, Food Styling by Anna Stockwell
https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/crumb-covered-poached-eggs?mbid=synd_msn_rss

Ingredients

  1. For the seasoned crumbs:
    • 8 strips bacon, chopped
    • 3 Tbsp. butter
    • 1 1/2 cups panko
    • 2 good pinches of cayenne
    • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  2. For the eggs:
    • 1 Tbsp. salt
    • 8 eggs for poaching
    • 1/2 cup Wondra flour, or all-purpose flour
    • 3 eggs, for coating the poached eggs

Preparation

  1. For the seasoned crumbs, put the bacon in a medium skillet and cook over medium heat, stirring often, until browned and crisp, about 5 minutes. Transfer the bacon with a slotted spoon to paper towels to drain. Melt the butter in the skillet with the bacon fat over medium heat, then add the panko. Toast, stirring constantly, until golden brown, about 5 minutes.
  2. Transfer the crumbs to a medium bowl. Chop the cooked bacon very finely. Add it to the crumbs and toss well. Season with cayenne, salt, and pepper. There should be about 1 3/4 cups. Set aside.
  3. For the eggs, bring water in a medium saucepan to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Add the salt. Fill a medium bowl with ice water and set aside.
  4. Poach 4 eggs at a time. Crack 1 egg into a small cup or saucer. Hold the cup in the simmering water and slip the egg in. Repeat with 3 more eggs. Slip a spatula under the eggs, giving them a gentle nudge, to keep them from resting on the bottom of the pan. Poach the eggs until the whites turn opaque but the yolks remain soft, 2–3 minutes. Lift the eggs from the pan with a slotted spoon or spatula into the bowl of ice water to quickly stop the cooking. Meanwhile, poach the remaining 4 eggs.
  5. When the eggs are cold, set them on paper towels to drain. Trim off any ragged egg whites to tidy up the egg into a neat shape. Gently pat the 8 eggs all over with paper towels so they are dry for coating.
  6. Put the flour in a medium bowl. Beat the remaining 3 eggs with 1 Tbsp. water in another medium bowl. Arrange 3 bowls as follows: flour–eggs–crumbs. Working with 1 poached egg at a time, gently dredge in flour; next gently roll in beaten eggs, covering it completely; then dredge in the crumbs. Set the crumb-coated egg on a parchment paper–lined baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining 7 eggs, spacing the eggs evenly in one layer. The eggs can stay like this, at room temperature, for up to 2 hours.
  7. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Bake the prepared eggs until they are deep golden brown and warmed through, 10–15 minutes.
Cook Something: Recipes to Rely On

Excerpted from CANAL HOUSE Cook Somethi

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Healing Breakfast Soup

Healing Breakfast Soup

Healing Breakfast Soup
https://www.egglandsbest.com/recipe/healing-breakfast-soup/

Prep Time
2 min Cook Time
6 min Yield
1 serving Recipe by: Physical Kitchness

This bowl of soup is backed with vitamins, minerals, and anti-inflammatory spices!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup chicken bone broth
  •  2 teaspoons full-fat coconut milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
  • Dash of cayenne *optional
  • 2 Eggland’s Best eggs (large)

Nutrition

Serving Size1 Calories178 Fat8.5 g   Saturated Fat2.5 g Cholesterol351 mg Sodium512 mg Carbohydrates2 g Protein22 g Preparation

Heat broth, coconut milk, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, and cayenne over medium-high heat until you reach a simmer.

Whisk well to incorporate all the spices. Turn heat to low as you make the soft boiled eggs

Fill a small pot with water and bring to a boil. Gently submerge two eggs into the boiling water for 5 minutes for extra runny yolks, 6 minutes for slightly gummier yolks.

*note, adding a dash of baking soda to the water will help the eggs peel easier

Remove the eggs from the boiling water and submerge into cold water. Gently peel each egg, then cut in half and place into the soup, yolk side up

Garnish with fresh chives if desired Filed Under: Breakfast and Brunch, Main Course, Low Fat, Gluten Free, Paleo, Whole 30

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Eggs~ What Happens When You Eat Them?

20 Things That Happen to Your Body When You Eat Eggs

Beyond easily upping your daily protein count—each 85-calorie egg packs a solid 7 grams of the muscle-builder—egg protein also improve your health. They’re loaded with amino acids, antioxidants, and healthy fats. Don’t just reach for the whites, though; the yolks boast a fat-fighting nutrient called choline, so opting for whole eggs can actually help you trim down.

When you’re shopping for eggs, pay attention to the labels. You should opt for organic, when possible. These are certified by the USDA and are free from antibiotics, vaccines and hormones. As for color, that’s your call. The difference in color just varies based on the type of chicken—they both have the same nutritional value, says Molly Morgan, RD, a board certified sports specialist dietician based in upstate New York.

1. You’ll Boost Your Immune System

If you don’t want to play chicken with infections, viruses, and diseases, add an egg or two to your diet daily. Just one large egg contains almost a quarter (22%) of your RDA of selenium, a nutrient that helps support your immune system and regulate thyroid hormones. Kids should eat eggs, especially. If children and adolescents don’t get enough selenium, they could develop Keshan disease and Kashin-Beck disease, two conditions that can affect the heart, bones, and joints.

2. You’ll Improve Your Cholesterol Profile

There are three ideas about cholesterol that practically everyone knows: 1) High cholesterol is a bad thing; 2) There are good and bad kinds of cholesterol; 3) Eggs contain plenty of it. Doctors are generally most concerned with the ratio of “good” cholesterol (HDL) to bad cholesterol (LDL). One large egg contains 212 mg of cholesterol, but this doesn’t mean that eggs will raise the “bad” kind in the blood. The body constantly produces cholesterol on its own, and a large body of evidence indicates that eggs can actually improve your cholesterol profile. How? Eggs seem to raise HDL (good) cholesterol while increasing the size of LDL particles (which are thought to be less dangerous than small particles)

3. You’ll Reduce Your Risk of Heart Disease

Not only have eggs been found to not increase risk of coronary heart disease, but they might actually decrease your risk. LDL cholesterol became known as “bad” cholesterol because LDL particles transport their fat molecules into artery walls, and drive atherosclerosis: basically, the gumming up of the arteries. (HDL particles, by contrast, can remove fat molecules from artery walls.) But not all LDL particles are made equal, and there are various subtypes that differ in size. Bigger is definitely better — manystudies have shown that people who have predominantly small, dense LDL particles have a higher risk of heart disease than people who have mostly large LDL particles. Here’s the best part: Even if eggs tend to raise LDL cholesterol in some people, studies show that the LDL particles change from small and dense to large, slashing the risk of cardiovascular problems

4. You’ll Have More Get-up-and-go

Just one egg contains about 15% of your RDA of vitamin B2, also called riboflavin. It’s just one of eight B vitamins, which all help the body to convert food into fuel, which in turn is used to produce energy. Eggs are just one of the 25 Best Foods for a Toned Body!

5. Your Skin and Hair Will Improve

B-complex vitamins are also necessary for healthy skin, hair, eyes, and liver. (In addition to vitamin B2, eggs are also rich in B5 and B12.) They also help to ensure the proper function of the nervous system.

6. You’ll Protect Your Brain

Eggs are brain food. That’s largely because of an essential nutrient called choline. It’s a component of cell membranes and is required to synthesize acetylcholine: a neurotransmitter. Studies show that a lack of choline has been linked to neurological disorders and decreased cognitive function. Shockingly, more than 90% of Americans eat less than the daily recommended amount of choline, according to a U.S. dietary survey

7. You’ll Save Your Life

Among the lesser-known amazing things the body can do: It can make 11 essential amino acids, which are necessary to sustain life. Thing is, there are 20 essential amino acids that your body needs. Guess where the other 9 can be found? That’s right. A lack of those 9 amino acids can lead to muscle wasting, decreased immune response, weakness, fatigue, and changes to the texture of your skin and hair.

8. You’ll Have Less Stress and Anxiety

If you’re deficient in the 9 amino acids that can be found in an egg, it can have mental effects. A 2004 study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences described how supplementing a population’s diet with lysine significantly reduced anxiety and stress levels, possibly by modulating serotonin in the nervous system.

9. You’ll Protect Your Peepers

Two antioxidants found in eggs — lutein and zeaxanthin — have powerful protective effects on the eyes. You won’t find them in a carton of Egg Beaters — they only exist in the yolk. The antioxidants significantly reduce the risk of macular degeneration and cataracts, which are among the leading causes of vision impairment and blindness in the elderly. In a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, participants who ate 1.3 egg yolks per day for four-and-a-half weeks saw increased blood levels of zeaxanthin by 114-142% and lutein by 28-50%!

10. You’ll Improve Your Bones and Teeth

Eggs are one of the few natural sources of Vitamin D, which is important for the health and strength of bones and teeth. It does this primarily by aiding the absorption of calcium. (Calcium, incidentally, is important for a healthy heart, colon and metabolism.)

11. You’ll Feel Fuller and Eat Less

Eggs are such a good source of quality protein that all other sources of protein are measured against them. (Eggs get a perfect score of 100.) Many studies have demonstrated the effect of high-protein foods on appetite. Simply put, they take the edge off. You might not be surprised to learn that eggs score high on a scale called the Satiety Index: a measure of how much foods contribute to the feeling of fullness.

12. You’ll Lose Fat

Largely because of their satiating power, eggs have been linked with fat loss. A study on this produced some remarkable results: Over an eight-week period, people ate a breakfast of either two eggs or a bagel, which contained the same amount of calories. The egg group lost 65% more body weight, 16% more body fat, experienced a 61% greater reduction in BMI and saw a 34% greater reduction in waist circumference!

13. You’ll Protect Your Liver

B-vitamins aren’t the only ovular micronutrients that contribute to eggs’ beneficial effects on liver health. Eggs are also rich in the nutrient choline. (One large egg contains between 117 and 147 milligrams of the nutrient, depending on your cooking method of choice). A review explained that choline deficiency is linked to the accumulation of hepatic lipid, which can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Luckily, a Journal of Nutrition study found that a higher dietary choline intake may be associated with a lower risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver in women.

14. You’ll Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Another side effect of choline deficiency and the subsequent accumulation of hepatic lipid is an increase in your risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

15. You’ll Lower Inflammation

Eggs are a major source of dietary phospholipids: bioactive compounds which studies show have widespread effects on inflammation. A review published in the journal Nutrients connected dietary intake of egg phospholipids and choline with a reduction in countless biomarkers of inflammation. Lowering inflammation has widespread health benefits that range from lowering risk of cardiovascular disease to improving the body’s ability to break down fat.

16. You’ll Grow Stronger Nails

Are your nails brittle and break off easily? Consider incorporating more eggs into your diet. Why? They’re an excellent source of biotin, a type of B vitamin which research suggests can help strengthen nails. The yolks have the largest concentration of biotin, so don’t skimp on the yellow center!

17. You’ll Boost Your Brain Health

There are approximately 225 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids in each egg. Omega-3 fatty acids are one of the most important healthy fats to have in your diet because they help prevent heart disease, arthritis, and osteoporosis. Research has also shown that omega-3s are beneficial for protecting against Alzheimer’s disease and improving cognitive function.19/21 SLIDES© Shutterstock

18. You’ll Raise Your HDL Cholesterol

Eating eggs is one of the best ways to increase your HDL “good” cholesterol levels. People with higher levels of HDL cholesterol have a lower risk for heart disease, stroke, and other health conditions. According to a 2008 study in the Journal of Nutrition, increasing your intake of dietary cholesterol from eggs can also help reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome, a precursor to type 2 diabetes.

19. You’ll Maintain Good Sight

Aside from omega-3s and vitamin D, eggs are an excellent source of vitamin A and carotenoids, which has been shown to help prevent macular degeneration, the main cause of blindness in older adults. Vitamin A is also essential for boosting your immune system, promoting healthy hair and skin, and supporting a healthy gut.

20. You’ll Build Lean Muscle

When you work out, your body needs protein to repair the tears in your muscle tissue from exercising. Eggs are a great post-workout snack or meal because just one has about six grams of the muscle-building macro. Whisk two into a scramble or an omelet with some veggies, and you have the perfect dish for getting lean and toned.20 Things That Happen to Your Body When You Eat Eggs Beyond easily upping your daily protein count—each 85-calorie egg packs a solid 7 grams of the muscle-builder—egg protein also improve your health. They’re loaded with amino acids, antioxidants, and healthy fats. Don’t just reach for the whites, though; the yolks boast a fat-fighting nutrient called choline, so opting for whole eggs can actually help you trim down.
When you’re shopping for eggs, pay attention to the labels. You should opt for organic, when possible. These are certified by the USDA and are free from antibiotics, vaccines and hormones.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/nutrition/20-things-that-happen-to-your-body-when-you-eat-eggs/ss-AAtmMai?ocid=spartanntp&fullscreen=true#image=1

Thank you for reading 🙂

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Breakfast Quesadilla with Soft Scrambled Eggs and Avocado Salsa

Breakfast Quesadilla with Soft Scrambled Eggs and Avocado Salsa | halfbakedharvest.com #breakfast #mexican #easyrecipes #brunch #eggs #avocado
https://www.halfbakedharvest.com/breakfast-quesadilla/

Soft scrambled eggs, crispy bacon, chipotle peppers, cheese, and spinach, all stuffed into flour tortillas and cooked until golden. Top these quesadillas with a spicy avocado for a complete breakfast. Perfect for storing in the freezer to have on hand for busy mornings.

Prep Time 20 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Total Time 30 minutes Servings 4 Calories 554 kcal

Ingredients

  • 6 large eggs
  • kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon butter at room temperature
  • 1 can (4 ounce) diced green chiles
  • 1-2 chipotle peppers in adobo, finely chopped
  • 4 whole wheat or regular flour tortillas
  • 1/2 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 cup shredded pepper jack cheese
  • 4 slices cooked crispy bacon, lightly crumbled
  • 1-2 cups baby spinach or arugula
  • 2 tablespoons fresh chopped chives
  • extra virgin olive oil, for cooking

Avocado Salsa

  • 1/2 cup fresh cilantro
  • 1 tablespoon fresh chopped chives or green onions
  • 1 jalapeño, seeded and chopped
  • juice from 1 lime
  • 1 avocado, diced
  • kosher salt

Instructions

  1. 1. Whisk together the eggs and a pinch of salt in a medium bowl.2. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the eggs and cook, undisturbed, until a thin layer of cooked egg appears around the edge of the skillet. Using a rubber spatula gently push/move the eggs around the skillet until fluffy and barely set, about 2 minutes. Immediately remove from the skillet.3. In a small bowl, combine the green chiles and chipotle peppers. 4. Lay the tortillas flat on a clean counter. On the top of 2 tortillas, evenly layer the cheeses, eggs, bacon, and green/chipotle peppers. Add a handful of greens (spinach, arugula, etc) on top. Then lay the remaining 2 tortillas on top. 5. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When the oil shimmers, place the quesadillas, one at a time, in the skillet and cook until golden on each side, about 4-5 minutes per side. Serve topped with avocado salsa. 6. To make the salsa, combine all ingredients in a bowl. Add salt, to taste. 

Recipe Notes

*To freeze these, assemble the quesadillas as directed above, but do not cook them. Wrap each quesadilla individually in plastic wrap and freeze in a single layer. Once frozen, transfer to a freezer bag. Freeze for up to 2 months. To cook once frozen, remove the plastic wrap and warm the quesadilla in the microwave for 1-2 minutes to thaw. Then cook as directed in the skillet. 

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