Did You Know? Harvest Moon 2021

Astrophotographer Anthony Lynch sent in this photo of the Harvest Moon, September 2013, taken at Phoenix Park in Dublin, Ireland.
https://img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/BB19vLua.img?h=500&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

https://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/topstories/harvest-moon-2021-when-and-how-to-see-september-s-full-moon/ar-AAOBTqx?ocid=msnews http://Harvest Moon

The Harvest Moon will be full on Monday (Sept. 20) at 7:55 p.m. EDT (2355 GMT), according to NASA — two days after passing Jupiter and four days before making a close approach to Uranus in the night sky. 

Jesse Emspak 

Strawberry Moon! Fascinating World

The first full moon of summer 2021, also known as the Strawberry Moon, rises tonight (June 24), marking the last supermoon of the year. 

http://www.space.com/
The full moon of June, also known as the Strawberry Moon, looms above Earth's horizon in this photo taken by an astronaut at the International Space Station. The image was captured on June 17 as the space station was orbiting 254 miles (409 kilometers) above the Pacific Ocean northeast of Guam.
https://img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/AALos6K.img?h=533&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

The full Strawberry Moon, the last supermoon of 2021, rises tonight! Here’s what to expect (msn.com)

Poem Share

The river is a flat, shining chain.  
The moon, rising, is a white eye to the hills; 
After it has risen, it is the bright heart of the sea. 
Because I love it—so—round as a fan, 
I hum songs until the dawn.

–Li Po (701–762)

LiPo
Photo by Lum3n on Pexels.com

A Tale~Cat Nights

✨ Cat Nights begin on August 17 when Sirius the Dog Star is no longer visible in the night sky. This term harkens back to the days when people were afraid of witches. A rather obscure old Irish legend said that a witch could turn herself into a cat eight times, but on the ninth time (August 17), she couldn’t regain her human form. This bit of folklore also gives us the saying, “A cat has nine lives.” Because August is a yowly time for cats, this may have prompted the speculation about witches on the prowl in the first place. Also, nights continue to get longer. Cats, crepuscular creatures, are nocturnal hunters. Their superior night vision means that the nights belong to them. 🐾

  • Farmers Almanac

Poem by MwsR

Heart Moon….MSR

There’s a moon in my heart.
It only comes out in times of dark.

You’ll never hear it remark
For it has no words.

Shining yet a shadow over feelings and thoughts.

The purpose of it is quite simple
It is to give new definition
Give a different perspective.

Like all moons it can be seen, not taken
And felt by only its maker.

Without it my heart would have stayed black.
You could say without it I’d never had made it back..

I’m grateful for my heart moon.
An evidence of change…


Did You Know/Information Share

a large tall tower with a mountain in the background: A full moon over the sky at Dingdu peak during the Mid-Autumn Festival in Beijing, China on Sept. 24, 2018.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/china-plans-to-launch-an-artificial-moon-to-light-up-the-night-skies/ar-BBOAHOu?ocid=spartandhp
China Plans to Launch an ‘Artificial Moon’ to Light Up the Night Sky

© VCG—Getty Images Ahell moon over the sky at Dingdu peak during the Mid-Autumn Festival in Beijing, China on Sept. 24, 2018.
The night skies might soon have company: Chinese scientists are planning to launch an artificial moon into orbit by 2020 to illuminate city streets after dark.

Scientists are hoping to hang the man-made moon above the city of Chengdu, the capital of China’s southwestern Sichuan province, according to a report in Chinese state media. The imitation celestial body — essentially an illuminated satellite — will bear a reflective coating to cast sunlight back to Earth, where it will supplement streetlights at night.
Scientists estimated that it could be eight times more luminous than the actual, original moon. It will also orbit much closer to Earth; about 500 km (310 miles) away, compared to the moon’s 380,000 km (236,000 miles).

But the ambitious plan still wouldn’t “light up the entire night sky,” Wu Chunfeng, chief of the Tian Fu New Area Science Society, told China Daily. “Its expected brightness, in the eyes of humans, is around one-fifth of normal streetlights.”
Wu estimated that new moons could save the city of Chengdu around 1.2 billion yuan ($173 million) in electricity costs annually, and could even assist first responders during blackouts and natural disasters. If the project proves successful, it could be joined by three more additions to the night sky in 2022, he said.
But much more testing needs to be done, Wu said, to ensure the plan is viable and will not have a detrimental effect on the natural environment.
“We will only conduct our tests in an uninhabited desert, so our light beams will not interfere with any people or Earth-based space observation equipment,” he told the Daily.
China’s space goals are not unprecedented. In the 1990s, Russia experimented with using an orbital mirror to reflect sunlight on some of its sun-deprived northern cities, according to the New York Times. The project was abandoned in 1999 after the mirror failed to unfold and was incinerated in the atmosphere.
In January, American firm Rocket Lab launched an artificial star into space, the Times reported. But scientists criticized the “Humanity Star,” as the reflective mini-satellite was dubbed, for contributing to artificial light pollution and cluttering in Earth’s orbit.


Every day we are getting further and further advanced in our world. I hope we never forget who created us. My hope is that we all step back and see all the possibilities we would not have without our creator.

MwsR ❤