Tag Archives: Did you know

Odisha Day~ Did You Know?

Odisha Day in Odisha in 2020

When is Odisha Day?

Odisha Day is celebrated as a regional public holiday on April 1st in the eastern Indian state of Odisha.

Also known as Utkal Divas or Utkala Dibasa, this day commemorates the formation of the state as a separate province in 1936.

History of Odisha Day

The region equivalent to the area of modern Odisha formed the ancient kingdom of Kalinga, which was conquered by the famous King Ashoka in 250BC.

In 1576, the coastal part of Orissa formed part of the Mughal Empire, and the region came under British control in 1803.

After a push in the early part of the 20th century to unify the Odia-speaking regions, the Bihar and Orissa Province was formed in 1912.

On April 1st, 1936, Bihar and Orissa were split into separate provinces of British India. Sir John Austen Hubback became the first governor of Orissa.

In 2011, the name of the state was changed from Orissa to Odisha.

Although Bihar became a separate province on the same day, it instead celebrates the formation of the state on March 22nd, 1912 as its state holiday.

Odisha Day is celebrated throughout the state, with competitions organised by local politicians, such as firework competitions.

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16 Facts About The Month of March

1. It’s March—Happy New Year, ancient Romans!

Welcome to the third month of the year—or, if you were born before 150 B.C., the first! According to the oldest Roman calendars, one year was ten months long, beginning in March and ending in December. It may sound crazy, but you can still see traces of this old system in our modern calendar: because December was the tenth month, it was named for the number ten in Latin (decem), just like September was named for seven (septem). So, what about January and February? They were just two nameless months called “winter,” proving that winter is literally so awful it doesn’t even deserve a spot on the calendar. Check out these vintage photos that prove winter was way worse in the past.

2. It’s the best month for basketball (but worst for productivity)

For civilians, on the other hand, March is known for one thing above all others: brackets. March Madness, as the NBA calls it, runs from March 11 to April 2 this year, and the safest bet you can make is that lots and lots of people will be distracted. One number-crunching firm predicted last year that American companies would lose $1.9 billion in wages paid to unproductive workers spending company time on betting pool priorities. (Suffice it to say, March is not a productive month—this is the single most productive hour and month of the year.) How to recoup these costs? Go into gambling. According to the American Gaming Association, fans wagered more than $2 billion on March Madness brackets for the 2015 tournament. Each one of those 70-million-or-so brackets has a one in 9.2 quintillion (that’s 9 followed by 18 zeroes) chance of predicting the correct winners of every game. Good luck!

3. It’s also the best month for vasectomies

March Madness is a cherished time to reacquaint oneself with the couch, especially during the early tournament days when dozens of games unfold consecutively. In other words, it’s the perfect week to recover from a vasectomy!

According to doctors at the Cleveland Clinic, the number of vasectomies surges by 50 percent during the first week of March Madness. Why? Patients typically need “at least a day with ice” to keep swelling down, says urologist Stephen Jones, MD, “So if they’re going to spend a whole day doing nothing, it’s not hard to figure out that they’d want to do it on a day they’d like to be sitting in front of the television.”

Smart clinics even offer incentives, like the Cape Cod urologists who offered a free pizza with every vasectomy in March 2012. That deal is certainly a cut above the rest!

4. March was named for war—and lives up to its title

So, if so many months were named for their Latin numbers, why wasn’t March called… unumber? Firstly, because that sounds ridiculous, and secondly, because the Gods had dibs on it. March was actually named for the Latin Martius—aka Mars, the Roman God of war and a mythical ancestor of the Roman people via his wolf-suckling sons, Romulus and Remus. With the winter frosts melting and the ground becoming fertile for harvest again in the Northern hemisphere, March was historically the perfect month for both farmers to resume farming, and warriors to resume warring.

Incidentally, the Pentagon still seems to agree with this Roman tradition: with the exception of the recent War on Afghanistan, almost all major US-NATO led military operations since the invasion of Vietnam have begun in the month of March. You can see a full list here, but to name a few: Vietnam (initiated March 8, 1965), Iraq (March 20, 2003), and Libya (March 19, 2011) all follow the trend.

5. Beware The Ides of March unless you’re a cat

We’ve all heard it uttered, but what does “beware the Ides of March” actually mean? On the Roman calendar, the midpoint of every month was known as the Ides. The Ides of March fell on March 15th. This day was supposed to correlate with the first full moon of the year (remember, winter didn’t count then) and marked by religious ceremonies, but thanks to Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar we know it for another reason. Supposedly, in 44 BC, a seer told Julius Caesar that his downfall would come no later than the Ides of March. Caesar ignored him, and when the fated day rolled around he joked with the seer, “The Ides of March have come.” The seer replied, “aye, Caesar; but not gone.” Caesar continued on to a senate meeting at the Theatre of Pompey, and was summarily murdered by as many as 60 conspirators. Ironically, the spot where Caesar was assassinated is protected in today’s Rome as a no-kill cat sanctuary.

So, if someone tells you “beware the Ides of March,” they are probably just being a jerk, or letting you know they’ve read Shakespeare. Don’t miss more facts about the Ides of March you should know.

Need more reasons to love March? Here are a dozen.

6. March 1: As the saying goes, March comes “in like a lion, out like a lamb.” That was certainly true on March 1st, 2007, when a detachment of 170 Swiss infantrymen accidentally invaded neighboring Liechtenstein when they got lost on a training mission.

7. March 2: NASA astronaut Scott Kelly returned from space after one full year, setting a new record for the longest uninterrupted trip to space.

8. March 5: Thirsty bros observe Cinco De Marcho, initiating a 12-day drinking regimen for anyone who wishes to “train one’s liver for the closing ceremonies on St. Patrick’s Day.” By the way, this is why we wear green for St. Patrick’s Day.

9. March 6: The Day of The Dude encourages participants to honor The Big Lebowski by takin’er easy all day, man.

10. March 13: Daylight saving time begins, freeing American city-dwellers from the constant refrain of “it’s dark before I even leave work.” Don’t miss these other daylight saving time facts you probably didn’t know.

11. March 14: Pi Day celebrates the annual occurrence of 3/14 with math jokes, pi-reciting competitions, and (of course) freshly baked pie.

12. March 17: St. Patrick’s Day turns the Chicago River green, and too many livers cirrhosis-damage-brown. (You’ll want to check out these St. Patrick’s Day “facts” that are actually false.) And on this day in 1973, Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of The Moon” first hits the Billboard Top 200 chart at number 95. A mere 14 years later (736 chart weeks, to be exact), it finally leaves the top 200 for the first time, setting a still-unbroken world record. (You’ve got a long way to go, Adele.)

13. March 20: The sun shines on the equator for the Vernal Equinox, giving us a near 50-50 split of day and night.

14. March 21: The 10th anniversary Twitter founder Jack Dorsey inaugurating the social media site with its profound first tweet: “just setting up my twttr”

15. March 27: Easter Sunday

16. March 28: Gorge Yourself on Discount Easter Candy Monday

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St. Patrick’s Day! Info

St. Patrick’s Day

Irish-Shamrock.jpg

When Celebrated

Always on March 17th

About the Holiday

St. Patrick’s Day, also known as St. Paddy’s Day is the national holiday of Ireland, which celebrates Saint Patrick the patron saint of Ireland, and is one of Christianity’s most widely known figures. St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated worldwide by Irish people and increasingly by people of all backgrounds. Celebrations worldwide include people dressing up, wearing of the color green, cities dyeing rivers green, shamrocks everywhere, drinking of alcohol, and large parades. See the History of St. Patrick’s Day for more on St. Patrick’s Day customs and celebrations.

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Freeze What?

When it comes to dairy products, getting your money’s worth from them can seem like an impossible task. Too often that gallon of milk ends up down the drain once the expiration date hits. But there is hope — and it lies in your freezer. Value and convenience can be found in freezing certain foods, and to the surprise of many, milk is one of them. Learn how to safely freeze and thaw milk for later use so you can save money and reduce waste.

Can You Freeze Milk?

Good news! According to the Dairy Council of California, it’s perfectly fine to freeze milk for later use. You just have to make sure you do so before the expiration or “best by” date. If you find yourself always pouring out-of-date milk down the drain, this simple solution can save you money and reduce food waste.

How to Freeze Milk

You can actually freeze milk in its original container, so long as that container is plastic. If your milk comes in a glass or cardboard container, transfer it into a freezer-safe plastic container before you freeze. Milk will expand when frozen, causing glass or cardboard to break — and you don’t want that mess in your freezer. ADVERTISEMENT

Because milk will expand, it’s important that you don’t place a completely full jug of milk straight into the freezer. Leave one to two inches of headspace in each container, whether you’re freezing the entire jug or you’re separating it out into individual containers. Then simply reseal the lid, shake vigorously, and place in the freezer.

Write the date on the milk with a marker. Milk will save in the freezer for up to three months, although it’s best to use it sooner rather than later, as it can absorb odors from food stored nearby.

How to Thaw Milk

For safe consumption, milk will need to be thawed either in the refrigerator or in cold water. Do not thaw milk at room temperature, because this can risk the quality of the milk if it gets too warm.

To safely thaw milk, place it in the refrigerator to slowly thaw. To speed things up, you can also fill a sink or a large bowl with cold water and place the entire container in the water. Replace the water as it warms up.

You may notice the texture of the milk after it’s thawed is a bit grainy. This is because the fat separates. But fear not! A vigorous shake will help return the milk to its original texture. Thawed milk should be consumed within three to four days.

Girl drinking milk

Image Source/Getty Images

How Milk Changes After Freezing

Although thawed milk will retain its nutrients, you may notice a difference in its appearance. The fat may separate, causing the texture to be slightly grainy, which is why shaking it prior to use is necessary.

You may also use an immersion blender to mix the fats back into the milk. Because of their lower fat content, skim milk and low-fat milk freeze best.

Another change you might notice in your milk is the flavor, and not because the milk has gone bad. Storing milk in the freezer (even with a sturdy plastic container) can cause it to absorb odors from particularly pungent foods (looking at you, seafood). This is why you should try to use your frozen milk sooner rather than later, and avoid storing it next to foods with strong odors.

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Can You Solve This?~ American Presidents

$1

Here are a few clues: He never lived in the White House. He owned slaves, but he struggled with the moral implications of owning another human being and freed every single one of them in his will. This president was born in the state that has produced the most U.S. presidents. In addition to being president, he was also well-known as a great military leader.

Slide 2 of 25: Here are a few clues: He never lived in the White House. He owned slaves, but he struggled with the moral implications of owning another human being and freed every single one of them in his will. This president was born in the state that has produced the most U.S. presidents. In addition to being president, he was also well-known as a great military leader.

Slide 4 of 25: This man wasn't only the president but also an accomplished architect. He was a bibliophile whose personal collection became the helped establish the Libary of Congress. When he was 76, he founded the University of Virginia, designing its buildings and curriculum. He died deeply in debt, despite his hidden talents.

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This man wasn’t only the president but also an accomplished architect. He was a bibliophile whose personal collection became the helped establish the Libary of Congress. When he was 76, he founded the University of Virginia, designing its buildings and curriculum. He died deeply in debt, despite his hidden talents.


Slide 6 of 25: This man is generally considered to be one of the greatest presidents of all time yet despite this, there's a typo in the memorial that bears his name. He delivered what is arguably the most important proclamations in American history. He was one of four presidents to share a very grim fate.

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This man is generally considered to be one of the greatest presidents of all time yet despite this, there’s a typo in the memorial that bears his name. He delivered what is arguably the most important proclamations in American history. He was one of four presidents to share a very grim fate.

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Slide 3 of 25: George Washington's visage graces the face of the $1 bill, which is fitting since he was the first U.S. president. He was a reluctant president who didn't spend any time or money campaigning and the only president in history to be unanimously elected by the electoral college. To learn more about the electoral college, check out these answers to questions about the American political system.
Slide 5 of 25: Thomas Jefferson was our second vice-president and third president. Among the myriad accomplishments of his presidency were successfully negotiating the Louisiana Purchase and commissioning the Corps of Discovery (better known as the Lewis and Clark Expedition). Before he took office, he famously penned the Declaration of Independence.
Slide 7 of 25: Abraham Lincoln was one of only four presidents to be tragically assassinated while in office. He issued the Emancipation Proclamation three years into the Civil War in 1863, declaring that all slaves were free. You'll love these timeless Abraham Lincoln quotes that are truly modern words to live by.

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Did You Know

Hot sauce causes insomnia.

Not sure what’s keeping you up at night? It could be all that hot sauce that you keep in your bag.

In one study, men were given tabasco sauce and mustard with their evening meals and had a more difficult time falling asleep. Scientists believe it may have something to do with thermoregulation—the body’s process of regulating its core internal temperature in order to get to sleep.

It’s not just Tabasco sauce either. Spicy meals, in general, could potentially contribute to insomnia and difficulty sleeping.

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