Celebrating Hispanic Heritage ( Homeschool)

We studied the flags, the culture, the cuisine, and the crafts of Mexico. Hispanic Heritage Month runs from September 15-October 15. We were fortunate to pick up some crafts from our local library.

MwsR

See pictures below~

Pinata
Mexican music craft
Spanish flower craft
Flags

We also learned the Spanish words for red, blue, yellow, white, and green.

MwsR

https://www.commonsense.org/education/articles/free-learning-resources-for-hispanic-heritage-monthhttps://www.commonsense.org/education/articles/free-learning-resources-for-hispanic-heritage-month

https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/articles/teaching-content/month-ideas-celebrating-hispanic-heritage/https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/articles/teaching-content/month-ideas-celebrating-hispanic-heritage/

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Browse/Search:free%20hispanic%20heritagehttps://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Browse/Search:free%20hispanic%20heritage

Flowers To Plant This Spring Season

https://images.food52.com/QcUztR1Jvi2Q-oc6QqoMlAF-Km8=/1006×670/filters:format(webp)/556acea1-99f4-487e-82cf-ad268d231ed9–2019-0131_floral-society_individual-seeds_flower_1x1_rocky-luten_017.jpg
  • 1. Pansies
  • 2. Marigolds
  • 3. Petunias
  • 4. Zinnias
  • 5. Sunflowers
  • 6. Sweet Pea
Continue reading Flowers To Plant This Spring Season

Garden Spacing

Plant Spacing Guide – Information On Proper Vegetable Garden Spacing

When planting vegetables, spacing can be a confusing topic. So many different kinds of vegetables need different spacing; it’s hard to remember how much space goes between each plant.

In order to make this easier, we have put together this handy plant spacing chart to help you. Use this vegetable plant spacing guide to help you plan how best to place vegetables in your garden.

To use this chart, simply find the vegetable you plan on putting into your garden and follow the suggested spacing for between the plants and between the rows. If you plan on using a rectangular bed layout rather than a traditional row layout, use the upper end of each between the plant spacing for your chosen vegetable.

This spacing chart is not intended to to be used with square foot gardening, as this kind of gardening is more intensive.

Plant Spacing Guide

VegetableSpacing Between PlantsSpacing Between Rows
Alfalfa [1]6″-12″35″-40″
Amaranth [2]1″-2″1″-2″
Artichokes [3]18″24″-36″
Asparagus [4]12″ – 18″60″
Beans – Bush [5]2″ – 4″18″ – 24″
Beans – Pole [5]4″ – 6″30″ – 36″
Beets [6]3″ – 4″12″ – 18″
Black Eyed Peas [7]2″ – 4″30″ – 36″
Bok Choy [8]6″ – 12″18″ – 30″
Broccoli [9]18″ – 24″36″ – 40″
Broccoli Rabe [10]1″ – 3″18″ – 36″
Brussels Sprouts [11]24″24″ – 36″
Cabbage [12]9″ – 12″36″ – 44″
Carrots [13]1″ – 2″12″ – 18″
Cassava [14]40″40″
Cauliflower [15]18″ – 24″18″ – 24″
Celery [16]12″ – 18″24″
Chaya [17]25″36″
Chinese Kale [18]12″ – 24″18″ – 30″
Corn [19]10″ – 15″36″ – 42″
Cress [20]1″ – 2″3″ – 6″
Cucumbers – Ground [21]8″ – 10″60″
Cucumbers – Trellis [21]2″ – 3″30″
Eggplants [22]18″ – 24″30″ – 36″
Fennel Bulb [23]12″ – 24″12″ – 24″
Gourds – Extra Large (30+ lbs fruit) [24]60″ – 72″120″ – 144″
Gourds – Large (15 – 30 lbs fruit) [24]40″ – 48″90″ – 108″
Gourds – Medium (8 – 15 lbs fruit) [24]36″ – 48″72″ – 90″
Gourds – Small (under 8 lbs) [24]20″ – 24″60″ – 72″
Greens – Mature harvest [25]10″ – 18″36″ – 42″
Greens – Baby green harvest [25]2″ – 4″12″ – 18″
Hops [26]36″ – 48″96″
Jerusalem Artichoke [27]18″ – 36″18″ – 36″
Jicama [28]12″12″
Kale [29]12″ – 18″24″
Kohlrabi [30]6″12″
Leeks [31]4″ – 6″8″ – 16″
Lentils [32].5″ – 1″6″ – 12″
Lettuce – Head [33]12″12″
Lettuce – Leaf [33]1″ – 3″1″ – 3″
Mache Greens [34]2″2″
Okra [35]12″ – 15″36″ – 42″
Onions [36]4″ – 6″4″ – 6″
Parsnips [37]8″ – 10″18″ – 24″
Peanuts – Bunch [38]6″ – 8″24″
Peanuts – Runner [38]6″ – 8″36″
Peas [39]1″-2″18″ – 24″
Peppers [40]14″ – 18″18″ – 24″
Pigeon Peas [41]3″ – 5″40″
Potatoes [42]8″ – 12″30″ – 36″
Pumpkins [43]60″ – 72″120″ – 180″
Radicchio [44]8″ – 10″12″
Radishes [45].5″ – 4″2″ – 4″
Rhubarb [46]36″ – 48″36″ – 48″
Rutabagas [47]6″ – 8″14″ – 18″
Salsify [48]2″ – 4″18″ – 20″
Shallots [49]6″ – 8″6″ – 8″
Soybeans (Edamame) [50]2″ – 4″24″
Spinach – Mature Leaf [51]2″ – 4″12″ – 18″
Spinach – Baby Leaf [51].5″ – 1″12″ – 18″
Squash – Summer [52]18″ – 28″36″ – 48″
Squash – Winter [52]24″ – 36″60″ – 72″
Sweet Potatoes [53]12″ – 18″36″ – 48″
Swiss Chard [54]6″ – 12″12″ – 18″
Tomatillos [55]24″ – 36″36″ – 72″
Tomatoes [56]24″ – 36″48″ – 60″
Turnips [57]2″ – 4″12″ – 18″
Zucchini [58]24″ – 36″36″ – 48″

We hope this plant spacing chart will make things easier for you while you figure out your vegetable garden spacing. Learning how much space needs to be between each plant results in healthier plants and a better yield.


Article printed from Gardening Know How: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com

URL to article: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/vgen/plant-spacing-chart.htm

URLs in this post:

[1] Alfalfa: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/alfalfa/

[2] Amaranth: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/grains/growing-amaranth-food.htm

[3] Artichokes: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/artichoke/

[4] Asparagus: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/asparagus/

[5] Beans – Bush: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/beans/

[6] Beets: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/beets/

[7] Black Eyed Peas: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/black-eyed-peas/

[8] Bok Choy: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/bok-choy/

[9] Broccoli: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/broccoli/

[10] Broccoli Rabe: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/broccoli-rabe/

[11] Brussels Sprouts: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/brussels-sprouts/

[12] Cabbage: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/cabbage/

[13] Carrots: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/carrot/

[14] Cassava: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/cassava/

[15] Cauliflower: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/cauliflower/

[16] Celery: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/celery/

[17] Chaya: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/chaya/

[18] Chinese Kale: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/chinese-kale/

[19] Corn: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/corn/

[20] Cress: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/cress/

[21] Cucumbers – Ground: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/cucumber/

[22] Eggplants: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/eggplant/

[23] Fennel Bulb: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/fennel-vegetables/

[24] Gourds – Extra Large (30+ lbs fruit): https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/gourd/

[25] Greens – Mature harvest: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/greens/

[26] Hops: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/hops/

[27] Jerusalem Artichoke: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/jerusalem-artichokes/

[28] Jicama: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/jicama/

[29] Kale: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/kale/

[30] Kohlrabi: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/kohlrabi/

[31] Leeks: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/leeks/

[32] Lentils: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/lentils/

[33] Lettuce – Head: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/lettuce/

[34] Mache Greens: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/mache-greens/

[35] Okra: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/okra/

[36] Onions: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/onion/

[37] Parsnips: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/parsnips/

[38] Peanuts – Bunch: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/peanuts/

[39] Peas: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/peas/

[40] Peppers: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/

[41] Pigeon Peas: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pigeon-peas/

[42] Potatoes: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/potato/

[43] Pumpkins: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pumpkin/

[44] Radicchio: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/radicchio/

[45] Radishes: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/radish/

[46] Rhubarb: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/rhubarb/

[47] Rutabagas: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/rutabaga/

[48] Salsify: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/salsify/

[49] Shallots: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/shallot/

[50] Soybeans (Edamame): https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/soybean/

[51] Spinach – Mature Leaf: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/spinach/

[52] Squash – Summer: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/squash/

[53] Sweet Potatoes: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/sweet-potato/

[54] Swiss Chard: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/swiss-chard/

[55] Tomatillos: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomatillo/

[56] Tomatoes: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/

[57] Turnips: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/turnip/

[58] Zucchini: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/zucchini/

Planting Tips

planting siberian squill

Denis and Yulia Pogostins

Get your garden off to a good start by planting your perennials at the right time and handling them the right way. One guiding philosophy: Perennial plants are all about the roots. Keeping the roots strong and healthy is the number one consideration when planting perennials. It’s those roots that will keep the plants coming up year after year. Here’s what you need to know about planting perennials to give them what they need to grow up and be beautiful.

Fall or Spring?

Knowing when to plant perennials is essential. Spring is generally the best time to plant, for obvious reasons. The soil is warming, the sun is shining, the days are lengthening and the rain if falling. Spring is also a good time to divide existing perennials that have gotten bigger and better and plant the smaller pieces in other locations.  
 
Fall is a good planting time for perennials that bloom in the spring or summer. Fall planting gives them time to grow strong roots to prepare for the big flower show the following year. Another plus to fall planting: Nurseries are cutting prices on perennials at the end of the season, so you can save a lot of money. 

Do not plant in the summer. It’s too hot, the days are too long and rain is unreliable in many climates. There’s too much stress for a new plant to thrive. And winter? No. Just, no. 

How Do I Plant?

New plants come in three forms. Knowing how to plant perennials correctly depends on which form you’re planting.

Container-grown perennial plants are the ones you buy at a nursery or plant center, already growing in a pot. They’re the easiest to transplant successfully. Dig a hole twice as wide as the container but no deeper. Pull the plant out of the pot, gently loosen the roots and place in the hole. Fill the hole with soil mixed with compost and water well. Fertilize a week after planting.

Bare-root perennial plants are less expensive than the container-grown ones, but they’re a little trickier. They are just as billed: a clump of plant roots. They’re not for beginners. Soak them in water before planting them in the ground. Add compost to the soil at time of planting and pamper them till they sprout leaves.

Seeds are the least expensive way to start a garden of perennial plants. Growing from seed takes more skill and patience than transplanting container-grown perennial plants. Perennials are slow growing, so if you sow seeds directly in the ground after the last frost you won’t have adult plants till late in the season. Best to start them in the winter, indoors, in small pots and pamper them until they are large enough to transplant outdoors.

UpCycle~

Michelle Brand is an environmental designer who specializes in upcycling plastic bottle bottoms into decor features. Michelle creates plastic bottle flowers by cutting and sanding the plastic bottle bases and tagging them together using a clothing attacher gun.

As an environmental designer, Michelle focuses on working with materials that others consider waste. By turning discarded plastic bottles into art, she challenges the notion that empty plastic bottles are useless. Michelle was drawn to plastic bottles as she find the pre-existing shape and material a challenge. She excels with the medium and uses the plastic bottle flowers to create iconic ceiling to floor pendant lights and flower walls.

In order to make a 6 foot cascade lamp Michelle must hand assemble 540 plastic bottles after first washing, drying, cutting and sanding them. To her the plastic bottle flowers are more than art and carry an educational message to consumers about reusing so-called waste material. Michelle believes consumers are becoming more environmentally savvy and are drawn to upcycled products as they are interesting and exciting. High-end USA chain Neiman Marcus carries her Cascade Lancashire chandelier range.

plastic bottle flowers

Source: Michelle Brand