Orthodox Easter~

Orthodox Easter Day around the world in 2020

When is Orthodox Easter?

Orthodox Easter, also called Greek Easter is the principal festival of the Orthodox Church.

In the bible, it is the day when Mary Magdalene found that an empty tomb in the cave in which Jesus had been placed following his death by crucifixion on the Friday before.

It signifies the end of the 40 days of Lent, meaning Christians who gave up something during lent to signify Jesus’ time in the wilderness, can indulge themselves again.

In Egypt, Coptic Easter Monday is celebrated on the same day as Orthodox Easter Monday. The day forms part of a wider spring festival called ‘Sham El Nessim‘ and is a national holiday.

The date is different from Western Easter as the other Christian Churches base the date of calculating Easter on the Gregorian calendar, but the Eastern Orthodox Church still uses the earlier Julian calendar for calculating the dates of festivals, which also includes Easter.

Why is it called Easter?

The name Easter is derived from ‘Ostara’ or ‘Eostre’, a pagan goddess of fertility, whose feast was celebrated on the Vernal Equinox. The word East is also derived from her names, as is Oestrogen, the female hormone.

However, In most languages other than English and German, the holiday’s name is derived from Pesach, the Hebrew name of Passover, a Jewish holiday to which the Christian Easter is intimately linked.

Easter depends on Passover not only for much of its symbolic meaning but also for its position in the calendar. The Orthodox church uses the Julian calendar for the calculation of Easter, whereas the Western churches use the Gregorian calendar. This difference can often mean that Orthodox Easter falls later than Easter observed elsewhere. The earliest date it can fall is 4 April and the latest is 8 May.

Easter traditions

Easter Eggs

Modern Easter celebrations revolve around eggs. They may be painted, rolled down hills or eaten if they are of the chocolate variety. The Christian tradition of egg is aid to represent rebirth and resurrection – new life being born from the egg. It’s also been said that egg recalls the shape of the stone that rolled away on Easter Sunday form the tomb that held Jesus’ body.

This egg tradition is almost certainly a distillation of a much older pagan custom celebrating spring. The ancient Persians celebrated their new year at the time of the vernal equinox by painting eggs.

Its adoption into the Christian traditions would have been quite seamless, as eggs were banned during the period of Lent preceding Easter.

The custom of decorating eggs is perhaps most famous in Ukraine. Known as Pysanky eggs, they are painted when raw as the uncooked eggshell absorbs the colored dye better than when cooked.

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Easter Facts

Did you know these 19 facts about the Christian holiday turned commercial powerhouse?

1. The tallest Easter egg chocolate was made in Italy in 2011. It stood at 10.39 meters and weighed an astounding 7,200 kg.

2. In the US, only 12 of the 50 states recognize Good Friday as a holiday.

3. The art of painting eggs is called pysanka, which originated in Ukraine. It involves using wax and dyes to color the egg.

4. The term Easter gets its name from Eastre, the Anglo-Saxon goddess who symbolizes the hare and the egg.

5. The exchange or giving of Easter eggs actually dates to before Easter and the giving of eggs is actually considered a symbol of rebirth in many cultures.

6. There used to be a tradition churches observed that resembled the game of “hot potato.” Here, the priest would toss a hard-boiled egg to one of the choir boys.

The boys would toss the egg amongst themselves and when the clock struck 12, whomever had the egg was the winner and got to keep the egg.

7. Peep peep… did you know Americans buy more than 700 million marshmallow Peeps during Easter? This makes Peeps the most popular non-chocolate Easter candy.

8. Americans consume more than 16 million jelly beans during this holiday. That is enough jelly beans to circle the globe not once, not twice, but three times.

9. Are you an ears, arms or tail person? Seventy-six percent of people eat the ears on the chocolate bunny first, 5 percent go for the feet and 4 percent for the tail.

10. During the holiday, more than 90 million chocolate bunnies, 91.4 billion eggs and 700 million Peeps are produced each year in the United States alone.

11. Next to Halloween, Easter is the biggest candy-consuming holiday of the year. Good thing they are almost six months apart, perfect for your yearly dentist check-ups!

12. An estimated $14.7 billion is spent in total for Easter in the US.

13. The Easter egg is said to symbolize and represent joy, celebration and new life.

14. Easter is the celebration of the resurrection of Christ; it is the oldest Christian holiday and one of the most important days of the year.

15. Half the states in the United States banned the dyeing of chicks on Easter; however, Florida recently overturned this law and now prevents the dyeing of all animals.

16. Not only did Florida overturn the dyeing of animals, but the state also held the largest Easter egg hunt, where 9,753 children searched for 501,000 eggs.

17. The White House of tradition of the Easter Egg Roll started back in 1878, with President Rutherford B. Hayes!

18. Workers in Birmingham, who make the famous Cadbury Creme Egg, produce more than 1.5 million egg delights a year.

19. The idea of the Easter bunny giving candies and eggs is said to have originated in Germany during the middle ages.

No matter how old you are or where you are in the world, Easter is a fun family tradition that never gets old.

From the Easter egg hunts to the taking your first bite into that chocolate bunny, it is not only a special religious holiday that marks an end to Lent, but one that represents the resurrection of Christ, too.

For those who aren’t so religious, Easter marks a long weekend, filled with fun.

Thank you for reading 🙂

Odisha Day~ Did You Know?

Odisha Day in Odisha in 2020

When is Odisha Day?

Odisha Day is celebrated as a regional public holiday on April 1st in the eastern Indian state of Odisha.

Also known as Utkal Divas or Utkala Dibasa, this day commemorates the formation of the state as a separate province in 1936.

History of Odisha Day

The region equivalent to the area of modern Odisha formed the ancient kingdom of Kalinga, which was conquered by the famous King Ashoka in 250BC.

In 1576, the coastal part of Orissa formed part of the Mughal Empire, and the region came under British control in 1803.

After a push in the early part of the 20th century to unify the Odia-speaking regions, the Bihar and Orissa Province was formed in 1912.

On April 1st, 1936, Bihar and Orissa were split into separate provinces of British India. Sir John Austen Hubback became the first governor of Orissa.

In 2011, the name of the state was changed from Orissa to Odisha.

Although Bihar became a separate province on the same day, it instead celebrates the formation of the state on March 22nd, 1912 as its state holiday.

Odisha Day is celebrated throughout the state, with competitions organised by local politicians, such as firework competitions.

Thank you for reading 🙂

Corona Virus Fact Continued…

Coronavirus has cousins.

Slide 5 of 14: According to an article from the Coronavirus Study Group (CSG) of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, which has not yet been peer reviewed, COVID-19 is a variant of the coronavirus that caused the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002-2003. As a result, its official name is: severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2, or SARS-CoV-2. It's also a relative of the coronavirus Middle East respiratory syndrome, also known as MERS, which surfaced in the Middle East beginning in 2012. And for simple ways to keep yourself safe from coronavirus, check out 17 Small and Easy Ways to Prevent Coronavirus.

According to an article from the Coronavirus Study Group (CSG) of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, which has not yet been peer-reviewed, COVID-19 is a variant of the coronavirus that caused the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002-2003. As a result, its official name is: severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2, or SARS-CoV-2. It’s also a relative of the coronavirus Middle East respiratory syndrome, also known as MERS, which surfaced in the Middle East beginning in 2012. And for simple ways to keep yourself safe from coronavirus, check out 17 Small and Easy Ways to Prevent Coronavirus.

Thank you for reading 🙂

Mental Health Fact and Myths

Myth: Children don’t experience mental health problems.

Fact: Even young children may show early warning signs of mental health concerns. These mental health problems are often clinically diagnosable and can be a product of the interaction of biological, psychological, and social factors.

Half of all mental health disorders show first signs before a person turns 14 years old, and three quarters of mental health disorders begin before age 24.

Unfortunately, less than 20% of children and adolescents with diagnosable mental health problems receive the treatment they need. Early mental health support can help a child before problems interfere with other developmental needs.

https://www.mentalhealth.gov/basics/mental-health-myths-facts

Myth: People with mental health problems are violent and unpredictable.

Fact: Most people with mental health problems are no more likely to be violent than anyone else. Most people with mental illness are not violent and only 3%–5% of violent acts can be attributed to individuals living with a serious mental illness. In fact, people with severe mental illnesses are over 10 times more likely to be victims of violent crime than the general population. You probably know someone with a mental health problem and don’t even realize it, because many people with mental health problems are highly active and productive members of our communities.

Thank you for reading 🙂

Corona virus Fact Continued…

 It won’t diminish in warm temperatures

Slide 4 of 14: Since most associate the regular flu season with the colder months of the year, many assume that COVID-19 will taper off as temperatures rise. But Salas-Whalen emphasizes that it's not as simple as that."Unfortunately, the virology of COVID-19 does not diminish in warm temperatures," she says. "Although the virus may have a seasonal cycle, it is not reasonable to expect a huge decline in transmission due to warmer weather alone. We see the largest decrease in infections when people refrain from being in locations with poor ventilation and/or large crowds."

Since most associate the regular flu season with the colder months of the year, many assume that COVID-19 will taper off as temperatures rise. But Salas-Whalen emphasizes that it’s not as simple as that.

“Unfortunately, the virology of COVID-19 does not diminish in warm temperatures,” she says. “Although the virus may have a seasonal cycle, it is not reasonable to expect a huge decline in transmission due to warmer weather alone. We see the largest decrease in infections when people refrain from being in locations with poor ventilation and/or large crowds.”

Thank you for reading 🙂

Corona Virus Fact Continued…

It poses a greater risk to people with obesity.

Slide 3 of 14: While it's well known that the elderly and those with compromised respiratory systems are at a greater risk of contracting and dying from coronavirus, less discussed is the fact that obesity and diabetes can also make people more susceptible."Patients with diabetes are more susceptible to severe complications from viral infections of any kind, and as a result, are considered a high risk population for COVID-19," says Rocio Salas-Whalen, MD, of New York Endocrinology. "Due to the pathophysiology of diabetes, patients can take longer to heal, putting them at risk for developing complications from the virus. This is true with any type of infection in diabetes."Salas-Walen also points to research that has found that excess weight changes the efficacy of the flu shot. Considering that more than two-thirds of Americans are overweight, that could have important repercussions as coronavirus spreads in the States. And for more about another high-risk community, check out 6 Essential Elderly Care Tips to Follow During the Coronavirus Pandemic.

While it’s well known that the elderly and those with compromised respiratory systems are at a greater risk of contracting and dying from coronavirus, less discussed is the fact that obesity and diabetes can also make people more susceptible.

“Patients with diabetes are more susceptible to severe complications from viral infections of any kind, and as a result, are considered a high-risk population for COVID-19,” says Rocio Salas-Whalen, MD, of New York Endocrinology. “Due to the pathophysiology of diabetes, patients can take longer to heal, putting them at risk for developing complications from the virus. This is true with any type of infection in diabetes.”

Salas-Walen also points to research that has found that excess weight changes the efficacy of the flu shot. Considering that more than two-thirds of Americans are overweight, that could have important repercussions as coronavirus spreads in the States. And for more about another high-risk community, check out 6 Essential Elderly Care Tips to Follow During the Coronavirus Pandemic.

Thank you for reading 🙂