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5 Movie Plot Twists/Share

Slide 3 of 11: David Fincher is no stranger to rug-pulling storytelling -- look elsewhere on this list for further examples of his work. But in his adaptation of this 2012 best seller, Fincher’s about-face regarding the culpability of philandering would-be murderer Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) and the whereabouts of Amy (Rosamund Pike), his long-suffering wife, ranks as one of the most exhilarating turns -- not just for the characters, but for the manipulability, and inescapable subjectivity, of the medium itself.

Gone Girl’ (2014)

David Fincher is no stranger to rug-pulling storytelling — look elsewhere on this list for further examples of his work. But in his adaptation of this 2012 best seller, Fincher’s about-face regarding the culpability of philandering would-be murderer Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) and the whereabouts of Amy (Rosamund Pike), his long-suffering wife, ranks as one of the most exhilarating turns — not just for the characters, but for the manipulability, and inescapable subjectivity, of the medium itself.


Slide 4 of 11: Before J. A. Bayona was ushering audiences through a new “Jurassic” era with “Fallen Kingdom,” he established himself as a top-shelf purveyor of suspense and surprise with this story about a woman who opens an orphanage and, not long later, loses her own adopted son. The terror that ensues is only a prelude to the tragic truth that emerges about what happened -- and what her role is in his fate.

‘The Orphanage’ (2007)

Before J. A. Bayona was ushering audiences through a new “Jurassic” era with “Fallen Kingdom,” he established himself as a top-shelf purveyor of suspense and surprise with this story about a woman who opens an orphanage and, not long later, loses her own adopted son. The terror that ensues is only a prelude to the tragic truth that emerges about what happened — and what her role is in his fate.


Slide 5 of 11: Franklin J. Schaffner’s adaptation of the eponymous book by Pierre Boulle makes a shrewd and methodical series of revelations to its protagonist George Taylor (Charlton Heston), the astronaut who crash-lands on a world where man and ape have reversed roles in the biological pecking order. But the film’s final shots gobsmacked audiences back in 1968, with the discovery that the alien planet upon which Taylor landed was, in fact, Earth all along.‘Planet of the Apes’ (1968)

Franklin J. Schaffner’s adaptation of the eponymous book by Pierre Boulle makes a shrewd and methodical series of revelations to its protagonist George Taylor (Charlton Heston), the astronaut who crash-lands on a world where man and ape have reversed roles in the biological pecking order. But the film’s final shots gobsmacked audiences back in 1968, with the discovery that the alien planet upon which Taylor landed was, in fact, Earth all along.


Slide 6 of 11: Edward Norton was a virtual unknown at the time of this film’s release, the story of a jaded defense lawyer who encounters more than he bargains for after taking on a client (Norton) suffering from multiple personality disorder. But the combination of Norton’s performance, and some effective sleight of hand by director Gregory Hoblit, successfully obscures exactly which of those personalities is in charge until the perfect moment for a stunning emotional wallop.


Slide 7 of 11: Alfred Hitchcock consistently tested the boundaries of audience expectations -- and tolerance -- but never more memorably than in this film about a young woman (Vivien Leigh) who flees from the authorities after stealing a wad of cash from her boss. The movie’s identification with her through the first half makes its second a stunning change in direction, as audiences not only have to deal with her death, but the prospect of following one of the accomplices (Anthony Perkins) to her murder.

‘Psycho’ (1960)

Alfred Hitchcock consistently tested the boundaries of audience expectations — and tolerance — but never more memorably than in this film about a young woman (Vivien Leigh) who flees from the authorities after stealing a wad of cash from her boss. The movie’s identification with her through the first half makes its second a stunning change in direction, as audiences not only have to deal with her death, but the prospect of following one of the accomplices (Anthony Perkins) to her murder.

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Bananas and Their Benefits!/Information Share

5 Evidence-Based Health Benefits of Bananas

 

Bananas are extremely healthy and delicious. They contain several essential nutrients and provide benefits for digestion, heart health and weight loss. Aside from being very nutritious, they are also a highly convenient snack food.

Here are 5 science-based health benefits of bananas.

1. Bananas are rich in fiber, antioxidants and several nutrients. A medium-sized banana has about 105 calories.

2. Bananas can help moderate blood sugar levels after meals and may reduce appetite by slowing stomach emptying.

3. Bananas are fairly rich in fiber and resistant starch, which may feed your friendly gut bacteria and safeguard against colon cancer.

4. Bananas may aid weight loss because they’re low in calories and high in nutrients and fiber.

5. Bananas are a good dietary source of potassium and magnesium — two nutrients that are essential for heart health.

Bananas are a popular fruit that happens to provide numerous health benefits.

Among other things, they may boost digestive and heart health due to their fiber and antioxidant content. Ripe bananas are a great way to satisfy your sweet tooth. What’s more, both yellow and green bananas can keep you healthy and feeling full.

All evidence & citations are from US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

 

 

Signs That Could Indicate Heart Disease/Information Share

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/healthy-heart/six-unusual-signs-that-may-indicate-heart-disease/ar-AAveu74?ocid=spartandhp

1. Creased earlobes

One such external indicator is diagonal creases on the earlobes — known as Frank’s sign, named after Sanders Frank, an American doctor who first described the sign. Studies have shown that there is an association with the visible external crease on the earlobe and increased risk of atherosclerosis, a disease where plaque builds up inside your arteries.

Over 40 studies have demonstrated an association between this feature of the ear and an increased risk of atherosclerosis. It is not clear what the cause of the association is, but some have postulated that it is to do with a shared embryological origin. Most recently, it has been seen that these creases are also implicated in cerebrovascular disease — disease of the blood vessels in the brain.

2. Fatty bumps

Another external indicator of heart issues is yellow, fatty bumps — known clinically as “xanthomas” — that can appear on the elbows, knees, buttocks or eyelids. The bumps themselves are harmless, but they can be a sign of bigger problems.

close up of arcus senilis during ophthalmic examination. © ARZTSAMUI/Shutterstock close up of arcus senilis during ophthalmic examination.

Xanthomas are most commonly seen in people with a genetic disease called familial hypercholesterolemia. People with this condition have exceptionally high levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol — so-called “bad cholesterol”. The levels of this cholesterol are so high they become deposited in the skin. Unfortunately, these fatty deposits are also laid down in arteries that supply the heart.

The mechanism that causes these fatty deposits in tissues is understood and it holds an iconic place in medicine as it led to the development of one of the blockbuster group of drugs that reduce cholesterol: statins.

3. Clubbed fingernails

A phenomenon known as digital clubbing may also be a sign that all is not well with your heart. This is where the fingernails change shape, becoming thicker and wider, due to more tissue being produced. The change is usually painless and happens on both hands.

The reason this change indicates heart issues is because oxygenated blood is not reaching the fingers properly and so the cells produce a “factor” that promotes growth to try and rectify the issue.

Clubbing of the fingers is the oldest known medical symptom. It was first described by Hippocrates in the fifth-century BC. This is why clubbed fingers are sometimes known as Hippocratic fingers.

4. Halo around the iris

Fat deposits may also be seen in the eye, as a grey ring around the outside of the iris, the coloured part of the eye. This so-called “arcus senilis”, starts at the top and bottom of the iris before progressing to form a complete ring. It doesn’t interfere with vision.

About 45% of people over the age of 40 have this fatty halo around their iris, rising to about 70% of people over the age of 60. The presence of this fatty ring has been shown to be associated with some of the risk factors for coronary heart disease.

5. Rotten gums and loose teeth

The state of your oral health can also be a good predictor of the state of your cardiovascular health. The mouth is full of bacteria, both good and bad. The “bad” bacteria can enter the bloodstream from the mouth and cause inflammation in the blood vessels, which can lead to cardiovascular disease.

Studies have shown that tooth loss and inflamed gums (periodontitis) are markers of heart disease.

6. Blue lips

Another health indicator from the mouth is the colour of your lips. The lips are usually red, but they can take on a bluish colour (cyanosis) in people with heart problems, due to the failure of the cardiovascular system to deliver oxygenated blood to tissues.

Of course, people also get blue lips if they are extremely cold or have been at a high altitude. In this case, blue lips are probably just due to a temporary lack of oxygen and will resolve quite quickly.

In fact, the other five symptoms — mentioned above — can also have a benign cause. But if you are worried or in doubt, you should contact your GP or other healthcare professional for an expert opinion.

Adam Taylor is director of the Clinical Anatomy Learning Centre and a senior lecturer at Lancaster University.

© ARZTSAMUI/Shutterstock close up of arcus senilis during ophthalmic examination.
Xanthomas are most commonly seen in people with a genetic disease called familial hypercholesterolemia. People with this condition have exceptionally high levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol — so-called “bad cholesterol”. The levels of this cholesterol are so high they become deposited in the skin. Unfortunately, these fatty deposits are also laid down in arteries that supply the heart.
The mechanism that causes these fatty deposits in tissues is understood and it holds an iconic place in medicine as it led to the development of one of the blockbuster group of drugs that reduce cholesterol: statins.